Category:Chalk Group Lithostratigraphy: East Anglia

From Earthwise
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Chalk Group of East Anglia, which locally has the most stratigraphically complete onshore succession in the UK (proved in the BGS Trunch Borehole [TG 2933 3455], occupies a geographically intermediate position between the distinct successions of southern and northern England, and this is reflected in the lithostratigraphy, which has some features in common with both regions. The classification of the Chalk mostly follows the traditional three-fold subdivision into Lower, Middle and Upper Chalk applied by Jukes-Browne & Hill (1903, 1904). Poor exposure at outcrop, and an extensive cover of Tetiary and Quaternary deposits has probably frustrated any major subsequent revision of this scheme. The current state of lithostratigraphical nomenclature for the Chalk Group of East Anglia is a patchwork of marker beds, some of which might be regarded as members, but have never been formally defined as such; member names have been proposed for the youngest part of the Chalk Group, which is comparatively well exposed in coastal sections of north Norfolk and at some inland localities.

The subdivision and marker-bed stratigraphy for the Chalk Group of East Anglia is summarised as follows:

DIAGRAM TO COME

References[edit]

JUKES-BROWNE, A J & HILL, W. 1903. The Cretaceous rocks of Britain. Vol. 2 - The Lower and Middle Chalk of England. Memoir of the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom.

JUKES-BROWNE, A J & HILL, W. 1904. The Cretaceous rocks of Britain. Vol. 3 - The Upper Chalk of England. Memoir of the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom.

Pages in category ‘Chalk Group Lithostratigraphy: East Anglia’

The following 33 pages are in this category, out of 33 total.