Category:Tellus How

From Earthwise
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Executive summary[edit]

TELLUS HOW builds on the NERC-funded Tellus South West environmental survey project and associated NERC research and environmental survey datasets acquired in 2013–14 in Cornwall and Devon. Using Tellus South West as an exemplar, TELLUS HOW broadens stakeholders understanding, application and innovative use of NERC data, embed NERC research and data into end-user business processes, identify and communicate evidence of impact, and recommend clear pathways and mechanisms to enhance both the impact of future NERC environmental survey projects and the likelihood of funding contributions from external partners and consortia.

TELLUS HOW was delivered by a partnership comprising the NERC British Geological Survey (BGS), the NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), and the University Of Exeter’s Camborne School of Mines (CSM) and Research and Knowledge Transfer (RKT) departments. The project was built around a series of secondments of BGS, CEH and CSM staff to businesses and local government (the End User Partners) in the south west region. A total of 6 secondments and one group workshop took place between May 2015 and March 2016.

Each secondment provided End User Partners with direct access to the Delivery Partners’ scientific and technical expertise and know-how in data interpretation, applications and management, and assist with integration of NERC data and knowledge into their business processes, information systems, toolsets and training programmes. Feedback to Delivery Partners and NERC provided evidence and case studies of impact of NERC data and research, improved understanding of wider end users business needs, and guidance on specific user requirements for data delivery mechanisms, access and interpretation tools and associated skills requirements.

The major limitation on the uptake of the Tellus SW data within small and medium sized businesses within SW England has been the lack of expertise and specialist knowledge as well as the limitations on computing platforms and software to extract further results.

To facilitate the uptake and use of NERC funded science requires further resources and science on the distribution mechanisms and facilities for remote processing and open access processing methodologies. This could be conducted through NERC owned super computers and 'Big Data' processing. By remotely processing and hosting the data users may be provided with processing methodologies and remove the need for businesses to acquire additional costly software or hardware.

Background[edit]

TELLUS HOW builds on the NERC-funded Tellus South West environmental survey project and associated NERC research and environmental survey datasets acquired in 2013–14 in Cornwall and Devon. Using Tellus South West as an exemplar, TELLUS HOW broadens stakeholders understanding, application and innovative use of NERC data, embed NERC research and data into end-user business processes, identify and communicate evidence of impact, and recommend clear pathways and mechanisms to enhance both the impact of future NERC environmental survey projects and the likelihood of funding contributions from external partners and consortia.

The Tellus South West project was a NERC-funded baseline survey of the environment and resources in south west England (www.tellusgb.ac.uk). The surveys were completed by a partnership of NERC Research Centres (BGS, CEH and British Antarctic Survey), working with the University of Exeter Camborne School of Mines to engage with researchers, businesses, local government and regulators. Tellus South West represents an investment of £1.7M of NERC funding, and was delivered in a highly challenging budgeting environment requiring engagement of several large external contracts, with funding released on the 1st July 2013 and completion of all data acquisition and spend by 31st March 2014.

The Tellus South West data includes:

  • Airborne geophysical survey data (high resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data), acquired by contractors managed by the British Geological Survey and now held by the British Geological Survey (covers Cornwall and Devon)
  • High Resolution Airborne LiDAR data, acquired by the British Antarctic Survey, processed by Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Agency and Plymouth Marine Laboratory and now held by the EIDC CEH (covers Devon and Cornwall, with an ultra-high resolution dataset covering part of the Tamar catchment)
  • Ground based surveys of soil carbon, biochemistry and microbiology, and ecosystem status and function, focussed on the Tamar catchment, carried out by CEH and now held by the CEH Environmental Information Data Centre.

The Tellus South West airborne geophysics and LiDAR data are published and downloadable via the Tellus South West data portal (http://www.tellusgb.ac.uk/data/home.html), on Open Government Licence terms.

Contemporary with Tellus South West, the BGS has completed a major survey of soil and stream sediment geochemistry of south west England as part of its Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) programme (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/gbase/home.html). This includes data on the baseline distribution of 53 inorganic chemical elements in the environment, including critical metals, nutrients, potentially harmful elements and tracer elements. The data was released in December 2014 and is accessible via the G-BASE south-west webpage http://www.bgs.ac.uk/gbase/gBaseSW.html

Scientific research following up the Tellus South West data is being pursued by the BGS, CEH and CSM with other partners, and Tellus/G-BASE data is a critical component of two current bids to the NERC Security of Supply of Mineral Resources Research Programme. The partnership is also developing proposals for a regionally-based and internationally exemplary environmental observatory built on, and catalysed by, the Tellus and G-BASE baseline data. These proposals are involving multiple research and stakeholder partners sharing complementary, cross-disciplinary research capability, observations and data, and will focus on valuation, management and sustainability of natural capital. TELLUS HOW focuses on innovation and generation of direct business value from Tellus data, but will also help foster the essential business, local government and regulator partnerships essential to achieve these longer-term research objectives.

Project objectives[edit]

Cornwall and Devon is an area of rich mining and industrial heritage with substantial future potential for metalliferous mineral, china clay and ball clay mining, and both shallow and deep geothermal energy. Former mining and industrialisation has left a legacy of contamination and wastes that require effective remediation and management, but also a rich heritage that contributes to the great amenity value of the region’s distinctive landscapes and coast. Much of the modern economy is built on tourism, agriculture and maritime activities, with Cornwall and the Scilly Isles eligible for European sourced regional development and INTERREG funding opportunities.

In this context, Tellus and G-BASE data have a wide and diverse range of scientific and technical applications, including:

Airborne geophysical data Metalliferous and critical metal resource evaluation, including 3D geological mapping of faults, fractures, intrusive igneous rocks (granites, gabbros etc), metalliferous mineral ore bodies and veins to depths of 500 m or more; mapping of background radioactivity in the environment; mapping of uranium veins, mines and associated waste and contamination spreads; mapping of clay deposits including non-potassium bearing china and ball clays; geological and soil mapping including soil type and soil parent material formations; radiogenic heat flow at surface for geothermal energy assessment; mapping of peat and carbon stocks in soil; soil wetness and wetlands sites assessment; mapping of uranium bearing soils and rocks for radon source potential.

LiDAR data: Ground surveying; landscape surveying; 3D terrain and landscape visualisation/simulations for planning, public enquiries etc; flood risk mapping; ground stability mapping including landslides below tree cover; geological and mineral reconnaissance mapping (faults, fractures, minerals veins); mine entries and mining subsidence mapping; surface wastes including mine wastes and tailings; photovoltaic energy assessment including individual properties and whole districts/regions/towns; biomass calculations; solar illumination budgets for agricultural (crop vitality and health, solar farms) and ecological applications; line of site/ slope aspect assessment (e.g. visibility of developments such as wind farms, mines etc.); archaeology and heritage site mapping and visualisation including fly‑throughs and simulations.

G-BASE data: mapping of potentially harmful elements (PHE) in soils and stream sediments; source identification of metals in groundwater (including private water supplies from wells and springs), streams and rivers, coastal waters; geochemical signature and sourcing of airborne dusts and pervasive pollution; bioaccessibility/bioavailability studies of PHEs and essential nutrients in soil and water; mapping of soil nutrient balances for animal and crop health; reconnaissance mapping of metal ore resources; sourcing of metal nutrients and contamination of natural habits and ecosystems including soil and water microbes and macrofauna; baseline data for soil erosion and leaching assessment.

To realise the value of these data and applications requires effective interaction between scientific and technical experts on the data and its applications, working alongside end-users to understand their business requirements, day to day demands, constraints and priorities. The need to provide some technical and focused support to help end users identify business opportunities from the Tellus data as well as support in building skills and capabilities was identified. This is of particular value to SME partners who may not have the in-house resources to access, keep pace with and develop new technical and or science-led business opportunities based on these datasets. The project established wider understanding of the value of NERC funded science and assists local and regional enterprise partnerships develop innovative, science-led proposals to attract national and European investments for projects in the environment, energy and technology sectors.

TELLUS HOW was therefore constructed around a series of secondments that provide end-users with access to skilled scientists, technical know-how and interpretation tools to deliver business value from the data. These secondments encouraged two-way knowledge exchange that:

  • embedded NERC environmental data and scientific know-how into end-user partner’s business processes and shares information and experiences on best practices to the wider end user and stakeholder community;
  • enabled NERC funded scientists to understand users’ business processes and objectives, and clarify barriers or impediments that inhibit the accessibility, value and impact of NERC data
  • transform this understanding into improved design of survey projects, more accessible data formats and delivery systems, and opportunities for external funding and innovation partnerships to help deliver high impact NERC science in the future.

Project structure[edit]

TELLUS HOW was delivered by a partnership (the ‘Delivery Partners’) comprising the NERC British Geological Survey (BGS), the NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), and the University Of Exeter’s Camborne School of Mines (CSM) and Research and Knowledge Transfer (RKT) departments. The project was built around a series of secondments of BGS, CEH and CSM staff to businesses and local government (the End User Partners) in the south west region.

The 5 TELLUS HOW End User Partners were:

  • Cornwall Council
  • Cornwall Wildlife Trust/Cornwall Environmental Consultants/Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall and Isles of Scilly partnership
  • Treliver Minerals Limited
  • Wardell Armstrong International
  • 3D Mine Surveying International

Each secondment provided End User Partners with direct access to the Delivery Partners’ scientific and technical expertise and know-how in data interpretation, applications and management, and assist with integration of NERC data and knowledge into their business processes, information systems, toolsets and training programmes. Feedback to Delivery Partners and NERC provided evidence and case studies of impact of NERC data and research, improved understanding of wider end users business needs, and guidance on specific user requirements for data delivery mechanisms, access and interpretation tools and associated skills requirements.

TELLUS HOW ran over an 11 months period from May 2015 to March 2016 inclusive and was structured into 6 Work Packages. The project was overseen by a Project Board with members drawn from the Delivery Partner and End User Partner organisations. A Project Management and Knowledge Exchange team, comprising one staff member from BGS and one from RKT, managed the project, ensure effective delivery of the secondments and shared project outcomes among the wider end-user and stakeholder community.

Project work packages[edit]

The project was divided into 6 work packages.

Work Package 1. Project Board (PB)[edit]

The project was governed by a Board comprising the Delivery Partners, Project Partners and Project Management Team. The Board oversaw the project delivery and end user interaction, guided the project manager on key stakeholder contacts and engagement and ensure effective delivery of the core secondments. The Board met 4 times at the University of Exeter Penryn Campus.

Date Discussions Attendees
12th May 2015 Project start-up BGS, CEH, CSM, 3D MSI, WA, CC, CWT
29th June 2015 Project Review and Ancillary Partners decision BGS, CSM, 3D MSI, CWT, TM
16th September 2015 Wolf Minerals decision and project progress review BGS, CEH, CSM, 3D MSI, CC
11th February 2016 Project roundup and project partner workshop

Tellus How Fayre

BGS, CEH, CSM, CC, CWT, WM, WA

Work Package 2. Project Management and Knowledge Exchange (PMKE)[edit]

The project was delivered by the Project Manager and Knowledge Exchange Facilitator. The Project Manager role was delivered by Richard Haslam of the BGS, a structural geologist with expertise on the geological interpretation of the Tellus SW datasets. The Knowledge Exchange Facilitator role will be delivered by Alex Huke, Research and Knowledge Exchange Manager at the University of Exeter.

Reporting to the PB, the PMKE team liaised with End User Partners; formalise arrangements and manage logistics for the 5 core secondments (Work Package 3); establish wider contact with stakeholders in the region to broaden use/understanding of Tellus project and NERC science; engage with potential hosts of, and make arrangements for, the shorter term Responsive Secondments (Work Package 4); arrange and run the Tellus How Workshop (Work Package 5) and identify and collate lessons learned, best practices and case studies of NERC science and data impact for the Tellus How User Guide (Work Package 6). Involvement of the University of Exeter Research and Knowledge Exchange team helped foster sustainable follow up of Tellus South West research and data beyond the lifetime of TELLUS HOW, by embedding practical experience of potential end-use, impact and follow-up innovation opportunities in the CSM, and RKT teams at Exeter University.

Work Package 3. Primary Secondments to End-User Partners[edit]

The core work package of TELLUS HOW involved secondment of staff from the Delivery Partners to the End-User Partners, providing access to up to 15 days of staff time per End-User Partner. The secondments provided each End-User Partner with access to the Delivery Partners’ skills and expertise in use and interpretation of the Tellus South West research and datasets, and related NERC research and survey outputs. The secondments also provided the Delivery Partners’ secondees with experience of working in a business environment and familiarity with their specific needs, knowledge that can be used to improve design and accessibility of NERC environmental datasets in the future. The secondments were staffed by technical experts drawn from the Delivery Partners based on the requirements identified by the End-User.

Work Package 4. Ancillary Secondments to End-User Partners[edit]

In addition to the primary secondments, 3 short secondments, each up to 10 days maximum duration were delivered in the third quarter of the TELLUS HOW project. These were set up by the PMKE team in response to knowledge exchange opportunities identified by their wider stakeholder engagement programme and delivered by staff drawn down from the Delivery Partners’ Expert Pool. The Ancillary Secondments targeted user sectors or key organisations not covered by the Primary Secondments, including the water industry, extractive industries and agritech.

Work Package 5. Tellus How Workshop[edit]

This event was held at the end of the third quarter of the project and brought together End-User Partners and members of the Tellus How project team and Expert Pool to review the outcomes of the secondments and exchange lessons learned and best practices. The workshop was held at the University of Exeter Environment and Sustainability Institute, Penryn campus and involved approximately 50 delegates. The workshop also offered an opportunity for the wider community to participate in the project through an open forum 'fayre' where the results of the project were presented.

Work Package 6. Tellus How User Guide[edit]

The PMKE team and secondees from the Delivery Partners developed a User Guide which provides guidance and case studies, targeted at wider end-users, on access, applications, interpretation tools, skills needs and sources of expert advice on how to use the Tellus and associated NERC datasets. It synthesise the outcomes from the Tellus How workshop (Work Package 5), secondees’ reports and lessons learned, and include recommendations for design of future NERC environmental surveys, and guidance on stakeholders’ expectations for data delivery, licencing, timeliness, tools, communications, supporting advice and technical support. It is published as a downloadable document via the Tellus South West website and also implemented as a WIKI page prototype. The WIKI will be sustained by ongoing update and maintenance after completion of the project.

Project partners[edit]

The project was run as a series of secondments from the delivery partners to project partners. The delivery partners are research organisations that will deliver skills and knowledge to the partner organisations.

Delivery partners[edit]

NERC British Geological Survey (BGS)[edit]

The British Geological Survey is a world-leading geological survey. It focuses on public-good science for government, and research to understand earth and environmental processes. It is the UK's premier provider of objective and authoritative geoscientific data, information and knowledge to help society to:

  • use its natural resources responsibly
  • manage environmental change
  • be resilient to environmental hazards

The BGS provides expert services and impartial advice in all areas of geoscience. Our client base is drawn from the public and private sectors both in the UK and internationally.

NERC Centre of Ecology and Hydrology (CEH[edit]

The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) is a world-class research organisation focusing on land and freshwater ecosystems and their interaction with the atmosphere. CEH integrates UK-wide observation systems and curiosity driven research, from the smallest scale of genetic diversity to large-scale, whole-Earth systems. CEH works across disciplines and facilitates academic, public, private and voluntary sector partnerships. CEH’s extensive, long-term monitoring, analysis and modelling deliver UK and global environmental data, providing early warnings of change and management solutions for our land and freshwaters. CEH’s health, security and societal development are dependent on securing the value of nature, building resilience to environmental hazards and managing environmental change. These major societal and environmental challenges drive CEH’s research. CEH’s independent, impartial science underpins UK and international environmental policies and innovation in the commercial sector for sustainable economic growth. We conduct our research all over the world. CEH is based in the UK and has partners throughout Europe and the world, they are well-placed to collaborate with international governments, bodies, businesses, and NGOs.

University of Exeter Camborne School of Mines (CSM)[edit]

The University of Exeter combines world class research with excellent student satisfaction at its campuses in Exeter and Cornwall. It is a member of the Russell Group of leading research-intensive universities. Formed in 1955, the University has 18 000 students from 130 different countries. Its success is built on a strong partnership with its students and a clear focus on high performance. Recent breakthroughs to come out of Exeter's research include the identification and treatment of new forms of diabetes and the creation of the world's most transparent, lightweight and flexible conductor of electricity. Our research focuses on some of the most fundamental issues facing humankind today and, in order to continue our reputation, we are furthering investment in research infrastructure.

The Penryn Campus has benefited from the Environment and Sustainability Institute; a £30 million interdisciplinary centre that leads cutting-edge research into the consequences of environmental change and the mitigation and management of its effects, while the Exchange building provides a lecture theatre, library facilities and spaces for small group discussions and exhibitions.

Exeter’s success has been built upon strong foundations of leadership, governance and management, a relentless focus on performance and a sector leading partnership with its students.

End-user primary partners[edit]

The End-User Partners consist of Primary partners who committed to the project prior to commencement and Ancillary Partners who were identified by the PMKE team and participated in the project. Primary partners have members on the project management board.

Cornwall Council[edit]

Cornwall Council is the unitary authority for Cornwall and the Scilly Isles, with a wide range of regulatory and public service provision responsibilities for a population of over half a million people. Tellus How will assist the Council with meeting aspirations and concerns in environmental management including natural and industrial heritage, health and wellbeing, and planning and regeneration. The Tellus How secondments will engage across several departments in the Council, working alongside Council staff and running workshops, to scope out and pump-prime applications of Tellus South West data for a wide range of Council functions. Specific priorities for applications and impacts include contaminated land and mine remediation, flood risk mitigation, greenspace and protected area health and management, managing degradation of historical earthworks, and rapid visual assessment of major development areas.

Cornwall Wildlife Trust (CWT), the Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall and Isles of Scilly (ERCCIS) and Cornwall Environment Consultants Ltd (CEC)[edit]

Cornwall Wildlife Trust (CWT), the Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall and Isles of Scilly (ERCCIS) and Cornwall Environment Consultants Ltd (CEC) is a suite of close working SMEs and organisations seeking to charitably and commercially support and protect wildlife and biodiversity improvement across Cornwall, the Isles of Scilly and wider region. The partnership has limited resources to keep up-to-date with new data types of data, methodologies and capabilities for environmental monitoring. The secondments will assist CEC to strengthen or develop new services and help CWT/ERCCIS develop knowledge and capability that is exportable to other Wildlife Trusts, NGO’s and records centres. The whole partnership will benefit from access to datasets that are more dynamic and spatially relevant with reduced uncertainty, strengthening interaction and services for local partners such as Cornwall Council, Natural England, Environment Agency, SITA UK, South West Water, farmers and land managers.

Treliver Minerals Ltd[edit]

Treliver Minerals Ltd, is a UK registered company (SME) with active involvement in exploration for tin and associated metals in south west England. Tellus HOW will assist the company with their exploration objectives through ground truthing of Tellus data and understanding of underpinning controls on mineralisation. Integration of the Tellus SouthWest data with Treliver’s exploration data will enable a wider assessment of the applications and value of Tellus data for environmentally sustainable mineral exploration and development.

Unfortunately Treliver Minerals Ltd withdrew their involvement in the project due to changes in the company priorities. However the mineral extraction industry was involved through a subsequent partnership with Wolf Minerals.

Wardell Armstrong International[edit]

Wardell Armstrong International is part of the Wardell Armstrong Group, a mining engineering/environmental consultancy that services the industrial minerals sector from ten regional offices in the UK and international offices in Kazakhstan and Russia, with a total worldwide staff complement close to 400. The airborne geophysical and geochemical datasets acquired by Tellus South West are comparable, though of higher resolution, to exploration data acquired worldwide for mineral exploration, planning and evaluation. The Tellus How secondments will assist the company to develop new applications of Tellus-type datasets for its international business including evaluation of the GeoVisionary spatial data modelling and visualisation tools developed by BGS and Virtalis http://www.virtalis.com/geovisionary/geoscience.php. The combination of WAI and Tellus How expertise will evaluate the additional value of high resolution Tellus data for mineral exploration worldwide based on thorough knowledge of the south west England geological and mineralogical environment and by testing the GeoVisionary toolset on an one of WAI’s exemplar prospects in South America.

3D Mine Surveying International Ltd (3D MSI)[edit]

3D Mine Surveying International Ltd (3D MSI) are a Cornwall based SME working globally with expertise in remote sensing, laser scanning and data processing. 3D MSI have extensive and well established links with the regions and international mining, geological and earth science sectors and offer a range of services including: infrastructure modelling, 3d design analysis, volumetric surveys, 3D visualisation, forensic analysis and hazardous condition surveys. 3D MSI already have in place advanced technical experience and capabilities to exploit TELLUS data, but hope through this project to work with other stakeholders and partners to explore new business opportunities and collaborative activity. 3D MSI’s expertise and knowledge of data processing and manipulation will be beneficial in supporting project partners, and itself, in identifying new commercial and non-commercial applications and services from the datasets. The company also sees opportunities to bring knowledge and experience from the mining and geological sectors to bear on other sectors for example agri-tech, land use planning and renewable energy.

End-user ancillary partners[edit]

The ancillary partners were selected by the project board during the running of the project.

South West Water (SWW)[edit]

South West Water is part of Pennon Group plc. South West Water provides reliable, efficient and high quality drinking water and waste water services throughout Cornwall and Devon and in small areas of Dorset and Somerset.

South West Water was established in 1989 with the privatisation of the water industry. They inherited a water system suffering from a century of neglect but, thanks to the tireless work of our 1300 employees, have brought the region's drinking water, sewerage systems and bathing waters into line with the stringent UK and European Union standards.

This extensive programme of environmental improvement has resulted in some of the finest bathing waters in Europe, picturesque scenery and clean rivers with stunning wildlife.

SWW believe that by investing in the future of the region, they are not only improving the quality of life for today's residents and visitors but are also taking responsibility for future generations.

Duchy College[edit]

Duchy College has a top quality standard of education with a comprehensive range of qualifications available up to degree level. They believe in learning that is fun and enjoyable. A mixture of highly qualified, full and part-time staff undertake teaching, normally in small groups, encouraging student participation and discussion. The College is part of The Cornwall College Group and offers a wide range of high quality academic and vocational training.

Duchy College works very closely with industrial partners to offer students work placement opportunities, study visits and additional qualifications not just in Cornwall but also in Europe — Sweden, Germany, France and Ireland. These organisations are too numerous to list but include the Cornwall Wildlife Trust, China Fleet Golf and Country Club, The National Trust, BOCM Pauls, Eden Project, SWARD, Silvanus and 3D.

Wolf Minerals[edit]

Wolf Minerals was incorporated in September 2006 as a metals exploration and development company. In February 2007, the company commenced trading on the Australian Stock Exchange. Tungsten was first discovered at Drakelands in the 1860s. It was not developed until World War 1 when an extensive wolframite deposit was outlined. Tungsten alloys were required to produce armaments, and commercial production continued sporadically until the end of World War 2.

In the 1980's Amax held the project and drilled out the resource which has resulted in the current JORC resources and reserves. In addition a pilot plant was constructed, which treated 6500 tonnes of ore, the flowsheet of which has been used as input to the current flowsheet. In December 2007, Wolf Minerals signed an option agreement for the mineral rights at the Drakelands Mine. The option was exercised in February 2014. The project, located near Plymouth in the south-west UK county of Devon, is the company’s core asset. Since 2007 the Company has worked to prove the viability of the Drakelands Mine through completion of a Definitive Feasibility Study in 2011; obtaining equity and debt financing; and construction of the mine, plant and associated infrastructure. Construction of the Drakelands Mine began on site in March 2014 and was completed on schedule in June 2015, with deliveries to customers commencing in September 2015.

Continued engagement[edit]

Tellus How aimed to not only communicate science with the project partners but to build a working relationship and continued engagement with stake holders in SW England. This has been achieved through potential future collaborations with the project partners to extend the initial project or to further develop the research.

The Work with Cornwall Wildlife Trust has been extended and taken up by Devon Wildlife trust. This has resulted in continuing work by CEH in the region.

Cornwall Council were impressed with the results from the initial trials undertaken by BGS and have been looking at continuing the work to identify and record historic sites within Cornwall using the Tellus SW LiDAR data which might be reprocessed by BGS in some areas to increase the resolution.

The Tellus How user guide, both in paper form and online will provide a platform for any future potential Tellus SW data users and access point for new partnerships to exchange ideas and research objectives with the project partners.

Sustained further development of scientific, knowledge exchange, research funding and innovation opportunities have been achieved through the collaboration with the partners and discussions with the end user communities.

The wider understanding of NERC science has been achieved through the dissemination of information during the workshop as well as the online resources that have been established as part of the project. These online resources will be updated to reflect continued developments in the region as well as future projects and collaborations with the end user partners.

Lessons learnt[edit]

The Tellus SW datasets included 5 baseline environmental surveys ranging from airborne surveys to stream micro‑organism sampling. Although the each dataset offers unique opportunities the limited knowledge within the community has limited the uptake of all datasets.

The majority of project partners used the LiDAR data and this has been used externally as well. This data set offered the largest benefit although it had the largest difficulties for the end-user when considering the full datasets. The size of the LiDAR dataset is considerable and therefore typically inaccessible to the end-users in its entirety. The data delivery mechanism for the LiDAR data was also cumbersome and frustrating with many users having to download excess data.

The difficulties with the large datasets like the LiDAR data are a good example of where ‘Big Data’ could be used with online processing for end-users instead of each user having to access and download the data. This would also enable the end user to download only the data required rather than excess data.

Many of the tools available to process and interpret many of the data sets are propriety and often expensive and therefore usually out of reach for many of the smaller end-users. Having a set of standard tools with documentation available online for the end-user would help the user engage with the data remotely and would give greater access for small and medium sized organisations. Additionally the ability for external users to add custom processing methodologies would allow a community to build up around the data. The sharing of these processing methodologies will ensure that the data remains relevant and could be used to highlight possible unforeseen future uses of the data.

Tellus How has engaged with the end-user community, especially argi-tech, to understand the future prioritisation, design and delivery of NERC data. By engaging with the end-users early in the process we can ensure that end-user requirements are considered and help improve alignment of NERC science with business needs. Continued engagement with the end-user is require to continue the discussions of the communities’ needs and knowledge exchange.

Summary and conclusions[edit]

The Tellus SW data has been warmly and widely received by the project partners as well as the wider community. Tellus How has help to integrate the Tellus SW data within the project partner organisations and develop new products and new markets for the project partners.

The major limitation on the uptake of the Tellus SW data within small and medium sized businesses within SW England has been the lack of expertise and specialist knowledge as well as the limitations on computing platforms and software to extract further results.

Tellus How has provided a pathway for the exchange of specialist knowledge between the research community and the business sector however there the computing and software needs to handle the large datasets collected for Tellus SW is still a major limiting factor to the uptake and exploitation of the data.

To facilitate the uptake and use of NERC funded science requires further resources and science on the distribution mechanisms and facilities for remote processing and open access processing methodologies. This could be conducted through NERC owned super computers and ‘Big Data’ processing. By remotely processing and hosting the data users may be provided with processing methodologies and remove the need for businesses to acquire additional costly software or hardware.