Excursion to Claygate and Oxshott, Surrey. Saturday, June 15th, 1912 - Geologists' Association excursion

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Geologists' Association Circular No. 145. Session 1911–1912. p.5-6[edit]

Excursion to Claygate and Oxshott, Surrey. Saturday, June 15th, 1912. (Transcription from GA Circular No. 145. Session 1911–1912. p.5-6.)[edit]

DIRECTOR: HENRY DEWEY, F.G.S.

EXCURSION SECRETARY MISS CADMORE, 4, Ulundi Road, Blackheath.

Take ordinary day excursion tickets to Oxshott, price 1s. 8d. return.

Leave by 1.37 train from Waterloo, due Claygate 2.15. Walk to the brick-field belonging to Messrs. Sims and Sons, where London Clay, Claygate Beds (Passage Beds), and Bagshot Sands are finely exposed in the working face of the pit so that the relationship of the beds is well shown. Fossils can be got from the Septarian nodules dug out of the London Clay. Continue walk to Messrs. Welch's brick-works, and examine another section of the Claygate Beds. Here they are thrown into sharp folds through their total visible thickness of some 30 ft. Then proceed through the Stoke Woods, noting small exposures of London Clay, and the influence of soil upon vegetation. The trees of Stoke Woods are all deciduous and for the most part oak, but as soon as we leave the London Clay and pass on to the Bagshot Sands and Passage Beds conifers replace these trees. At Oxshott Warren is a large pit in the Bagshot Sands showing the characteristic current-bedding, pipe-clay seams, and ferruginous concretions, capped by contorted plateau gravel. Thence walk through the pine-woods, noting by the way the distant gorge of the Mole, where the river cuts through the Chalk escarpment, to Mr. Scriven's brick-pit in the lower lilac clays of the Bracklesham Series. If time permit the walk will be continued to the so-called "too ft. terrace" of the Mole near Cobham, where at Leigh Hill gravel pits are extensive, sections showing the contorted river gravels reclining upon the uneven surface of Bagshot Sands which form the solid shelf. A distant view of the lower terrace (the 50 ft.) will be obtained as the party returns to Pinewoods for tea. Plain tea, price 9d. (eggs 2d. each). Return to Oxshott Station in time for the 7.59 train and examine a section of the Claygate Beds beside the path down to the station. Total walking distance 7 miles. There are many sections worth photographing.

REFERENCES.

One-inch Map (Geological Survey, colour-printed), London, Sheet 3.

One-inch Plain Ordnance Map, Sheet 270, South London, and 286 (Reigate). 1899.

1899. STEBBING, W. P. D.—"Excursion to Claygate and Oxshott." Proc. Geol.Assoc., p. 256.

1909. WOODWARD, H. B.—" Geology of London," Mem. Geol. Surv., price 1s.

Images[edit]

Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912[edit]

List of photographs[edit]

Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912[edit]

Page 99 P805524 Welchs' Clay pit. Section of Claygate beds. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. Here the Claygate beds which are passage beds between the London Clay and the Bagshot Sands are exposed for a depth of 40 feet and show well the alternate beds of sand and clay.
Page 99 P805525 Double fold in Claygate beds. Owing to the action of springs beneath the water bubbles up carrying with it 'running sand', this causes the clay to slip thus forming these folds. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912.
Page 99 P805526 Mr Scrivens' Brick pits, Tudor Court, Oxshott. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. Lower Lilac Clays of the Bracklesham Beds. This outlier of Bracklesham Beds represents only the lower third of that series for neither the glauconitic sands nor the upper clays are seen although they are well developed at St George's Hill, three miles to the west.
Page 99 P805527 Mr Scrivens' Brick pits, Tudor Court, Oxshott. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. Lower Lilac Clays of the Bracklesham Beds. This outlier of Bracklesham Beds represents only the lower third of that series for neither the glauconitic sands nor the upper clays are seen although they are well developed at St George's Hill, three miles to the west.
Page 101 P805528 Mr Scrivens' Brick pits, Tudor Court, near Oxshott Warren. Bracklesham Beds. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. These beds consist of alternations of sand and sandy clays, some of the sands containing glauconite grains. These beds appear to have been formed in a quiet estuary by the sediment brought down by a great river, the changes to the coarser detritus being caused by the state of flood.
Page 101 P805529 Mr Scrivens' Brick pits, Tudor Court, near Oxshott Warren. Bracklesham Beds. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. These beds consist of alternations of sand and sandy clays, some of the sands containing glauconite grains. These beds appear to have been formed in a quiet estuary by the sediment brought down by a great river, the changes to the coarser detritus being caused by the state of flood.
Page 101 P805530 Mr Scrivens' Brick pits, Tudor Court, near Oxshott Warren. Bracklesham Beds. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. In the upper part of this section, the clay contains lignite, leaves, and the seeds of plants, showing that the climate of this period must have been almost tropical.
Page 101 P805531 Mr Scrivens' Brick pits, Tudor Court, near Oxshott Warren. Bracklesham Beds. Excursion to Claygate, June 15th 1912. Large ferruginous ovoid concretions consisting of concentric layers. These are due to the actions of chalybeate waters becoming oxidised in contact with sand.