Excursion to Upware. Saturday, May 10th, 1914 - Geologists' Association excursion

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Geologists' Association Circular No. 166. Session 1913-1914. p.5-6[edit]

Excursion to Upware, Saturday, May 16th, 1914 (Transcription from: GA Circular No. 166. Session 1913-1914. p.5-6)[edit]

DIRECTOR: T. MCKENNY HUGHES, F.R.S.

EXCURSION SECRETARY: Miss E. PEARSE, 3, Bessborough Mansions, Westminster, S.W.

Leave Liverpool Street Station 11.5 a.m. Arrive Cambridge 12.21 a.m. Meet Miss Pearse in main line booking office not later than 10.50 a.m., to obtain special tickets, price 6/2.

At Cambridge take motor omnibus (2 miles) to the river near Victoria Bridge, where a steamer will be waiting to take the party to Upware. Omnibus fare 2d. each way. Steamer fare 2/- return. Members should bring lunch.

On the voyage down the river the characters of the fenland may be studied; the alluvium passing into "fen," and the adjoining land being seen to consist sometimes of mud and clay, and sometimes of peat, while large trees are often found during trenching or draining operations and left where found. Many places of great archaeological interest, will be passed and the geological reasons for the choice of sites pointed out, the chief of these being springs of good water issuing from a hard jointed bed of chalk known as the Fulbourn Rock which occurs in this district 16 ft. below the Burwell Rock, which marks, as it has determined, the first rise above the alluvium, and gives rise to a terrace which is a conspicuous feature on the right as we go down the river.

The party will land at Upware opposite the Public House known by the sign, "Five miles from anywhere and no hurry," which will be the rendezvous for the day, and where tea will be ready at 4 o'clock. (Plain tea 6d., with eggs 9d.)

From the Inn, walk mile north to a quarry in the Coral Rags resting upon Coralline Ooiite, and containing abundant fossils. Some of the party may proceed ½ miles further to another quarry in the Coialline Oolite, passing on the way an outcrop of Lower Greensand. Attention he directed to the structural problems raised by the apparent relation of the beds exposed in these sections. The Corallian of Upware is of interest as another phase of a very variable series which occurs between the Oxford and Kimeridge Clays. It was referred to as the Tetworth Clay by Prof. Sedgwick, but afterwards as the Ampthill Clay, from a locality in which it was better seen. It does not appear to have any fossils peculiar to it, but those of the upper and of the lower series, that is of the Kimeridge and Oxford Clays, overlap and are commingled in it. The Tetworth Clay probably represents an age during which varying conditions favourable to the formation of limestones recurred here and there in the district, and at Upware these were characterised by the growth of an immense number and variety of corals.

Return by steamer from Upware in time to catch the 8.44 p.m. train from Cambridge, arriving Liverpool Street 10.2 p.m.

Images[edit]

List of photographs[edit]

Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914[edit]

Page 33 P804696 Our rendezvous. [The ?Five Miles from Anywhere: No Hurry? inn.]. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914.
Page 33 P804697 Barrow near Upware. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914.
Page 33 P804698 Trench round the barrow. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914.
Page 35 P804699 Sections of Coral Rag, resting on Coralline Oolite, Upware. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914. The Corallian of Upware is of interest as another phase of a very variable series which occurs between the Oxford and Kim[m]eridge Clays. It is referred to as the Tetworth Clay by Prof. Sedgwick but afterwards as the Ampthill Clay from a locality in which it was better seen. It does not appear to have any fossils peculiar to it but those of the Upper and Lower Series, that is of the Kim[m]eridge and Oxford Clays overlap and are commingled in it. The Tetworth Clay probably represents an age during which varying conditions favourable to the formation of limestones recurred here and there in the district, and at Upware these were characterised by the growth on an immense number and variety of corals (Hughes).
Page 35 P804700 Sections of Coral Rag, resting on Coralline Oolite, Upware. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914. The Corallian of Upware is of interest as another phase of a very variable series which occurs between the Oxford and Kim[m]eridge Clays. It is referred to as the Tetworth Clay by Prof. Sedgwick but afterwards as the Ampthill Clay from a locality in which it was better seen. It does not appear to have any fossils peculiar to it but those of the Upper and Lower Series, that is of the Kim[m]eridge and Oxford Clays overlap and are commingled in it. The Tetworth Clay probably represents an age during which varying conditions favourable to the formation of limestones recurred here and there in the district, and at Upware these were characterised by the growth on an immense number and variety of corals (Hughes).
Page 35 P804701 Sections of Coral Rag, resting on Coralline Oolite, Upware. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914. The Corallian of Upware is of interest as another phase of a very variable series which occurs between the Oxford and Kim[m]eridge Clays. It is referred to as the Tetworth Clay by Prof. Sedgwick but afterwards as the Ampthill Clay from a locality in which it was better seen. It does not appear to have any fossils peculiar to it but those of the Upper and Lower Series, that is of the Kim[m]eridge and Oxford Clays overlap and are commingled in it. The Tetworth Clay probably represents an age during which varying conditions favourable to the formation of limestones recurred here and there in the district, and at Upware these were characterised by the growth on an immense number and variety of corals (Hughes).
Page 35 P804702 Sections of Coral Rag, resting on Coralline Oolite, Upware. Excursion to Upware, May 10th 1914. The Corallian of Upware is of interest as another phase of a very variable series which occurs between the Oxford and Kim[m]eridge Clays. It is referred to as the Tetworth Clay by Prof. Sedgwick but afterwards as the Ampthill Clay from a locality in which it was better seen. It does not appear to have any fossils peculiar to it but those of the Upper and Lower Series, that is of the Kim[m]eridge and Oxford Clays overlap and are commingled in it. The Tetworth Clay probably represents an age during which varying conditions favourable to the formation of limestones recurred here and there in the district, and at Upware these were characterised by the growth on an immense number and variety of corals (Hughes).