Visit to the Royal Albert Docks Extension. Saturday, March 21st, 1914 - Geologists' Association excursion

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Geologists' Association Circular No. 164. Session 1913-1914. p.4[edit]

Visit to the Royal Albert Docks Extension. Saturday, March 21st, 1914 (Transcription from: GA Circular No. 164. Session 1913-1914. p.4)[edit]

(In conjunction with the Essex Field Club.)

DIRECTORS: A. BINNS M.I.C.E. (Resident Engineer), and G. BARROW, F.G.S.

Although this locality vas visited by the Association so recently as October last, the enormous excavations have been carried ou so rapidly that many entirely different sections are now visible, and members will find it interesting to compare them ill those seen on the previous occasion.

An additional feature will be the inspection of the contractors' methods of dealing with the excavations, and the formation of the concrete walls.

The official train leaves Fenchurch Street at 2.3 p.m., arriving at North Woolwich 2.36 p.m. Return fare 8d. Members will take their own tickets, but should allow ample time for obtaining them, as the traffic is very great on Saturday afternoons.

Return trains leave North Woolwich, 5.44, 5.51, 6.20, 6,40 p.m.

Images[edit]

Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914[edit]

List of photographs[edit]

Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914[edit]

Page 5 P804641 Section of the entrance lock which when completed will be 800 feet long, 100 feet wide and 45 feet deep. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 5 P804642 Section of the entrance lock which when completed will be 800 feet long, 100 feet wide and 45 feet deep. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914. Added note: Ballast with chalk below; Alluvial clay; Peat; Made ground. [Bottom to top.].
Page 5 P804643 The gantry used in transporting material for the foundations and walls of the lock. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 5 P804644 Excavation for the footings of the lock wall which are laid in the Chalk. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914. Added note: Chalk; Thanet Sand in places; Thames Ballast. [Bottom to top.].
Page 7 P804645 Alluvial clay and peat resting on ballast in the south trench which has been excavated for a length of 4,300 feet. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914. On the left is the ?Lubecker? or land dredger, two of which are employed in the excavation. On the ballast forming the base are the tree trunks.
Page 7 P804646 Alluvial clay and peat resting on ballast in the south trench which has been excavated for a length of 4,300 feet. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914. On the left is the ?Lubecker? or land dredger, two of which are employed in the excavation. On the ballast forming the base are the tree trunks.
Page 7 P804647 Snags or yew trunks brought down by the old river. The wood is still so firm that the teeth of the land dredger will not cut through them so they are left to dry. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 7 P804648 Snags or yew trunks brought down by the old river. The wood is still so firm that the teeth of the land dredger will not cut through them so they are left to dry. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 9 P804649 Alluvial clay showing section of tree trunk or waterlogged wood which is as soft as cheese in this position. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 9 P804650 Peat overlying clay with a yew trunk standing up to dry with the wood almost fresh. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 9 P804651 Roots of plants which formed the peat penetrating the clay. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 9 P804652 Roots of plants which formed the peat penetrating the clay. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 11 P804653 Clay filling an old creek, formerly Ham Creek. This was navigable up to the year 1656. As the clay was too stiff for the land dredger it had to be pinched out by cranes. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 11 P804654 Clay filling an old creek, formerly Ham Creek. This was navigable up to the year 1656. As the clay was too stiff for the land dredger it had to be pinched out by cranes. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 11 P804655 Clay filling a washout in the peat where a cross stream has cut away the peat forming a dumb fault, as called by coal miners. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.
Page 11 P804656 Sun cracks in alluvial clay exposed by mechanical digger. Excursion to Royal Albert Docks, March 21st 1914.