William Francis Porter McLintock

From Earthwise
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Pioneers of BGS - Home A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Images[edit]

Timeline[edit]

Date Details
1887 Born
1907 Assistant Curator
1911 Transferred to Royal Scottish Museum
1921 Curator Museum of Practical Geology

Biographies and obituaries[edit]

Phemister. J. Obituary - William Francis Porter McLintock (Geological Survey of Great Britain). Proceedings of the Geological Society of London Pt. 1582 1960.

W. F. P. McLintock — Wikipedia article

M'LINTOCK, WILLIAM FRANCIS PORTER. 02/02/1887-21/02/1960 Biographical Index of Former Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783 – 2002. The Royal Society of Edinburgh. July 2006.

Phemister, James revised by Sabine, Peter A. McLintock, William Francis Porter (1887–1960)] Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/34791

W.F.P. McLintock (1887–1960) in Barber, A.J. Peach and Horne: the British Association excursion to Assynt September 1912. Continental tectonics and mountain building. Geological Society Special publication 335

Publications[edit]

Survey publications[edit]

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Statham, P.A. ; Sabine, P.A. ; Museum of Practical Geology (1983). Gemstones in the Geological Museum : a guide to the collection. 4th ed. / rev. by Patricia M. Statham ; based on the 3rd ed. revision by P.A. Sabine. London : Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. A gravitational survey over a region of magnetic anomaly at Thrussington, Leicestershire. Summary of Progress of the Geological Survey of GB & Museum of Practical Geology for 1930 pt.2, 1931 p.74-90.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. A gravitational survey over the buried Kelvin Valley at Drumry, near Glasgow. Summary of Progress of the Geological Survey of GB & Museum of Practical Geology for 1928, part 2, 1929 p.1-9.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. A gravitational survey over the Pentland Fault, near Portobello, Midlothian, Scotland. Summary of Progress of the Geological Survey of GB & Museum of Practical Geology for 1928 pt.2, 1929 p.10-28.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. A gravitational survey over the Swynnerton Dyke, Yarnfield, Staffordshire. Summary of Progress of the Geological Survey of GB & Museum of Practical Geology for 1927 pt.2, 1928 p.1-14.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. A gravitational survey over the Swynnerton Dyke, Yarnfield, Staffordshire. Mining Magazine 1927 p.1-4.

Sabine, P.A. ; McLintock, W.F.P. ; Geological Museum (1951). A guide to the collection of gemstones in the Geological Museum (Museum of Practical Geology). 3rd ed.. London : HMSO.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Geological Museum (1912). Guide to the collection of gemstones in the Museum of Practical Geology. London : HMSO.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Geological Museum (1923). Guide to the collection of gemstones in the Museum of Practical Geology. 2nd ed. London : HMSO.

External publications[edit]

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. (1929). A gravitational survey over the buried Kelvin Valley at Drumry, near Glasgow. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Vol 56 pt/no 1 (1929) p.141-155 (1929) ; p.141-155.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. On a magnetic survey over the Lornty Dyke, Blairgowrie, Perthshire. Summary of Progress of the Geological Survey of GB & Museum of Practical Geology for 1930 pt.3, 1931 p.24-29.


McLintock, W.F.P. ; Geological Museum ; Geological Survey of Great Britain. The new Museum of Practical Geology, Exhibition Road, South Kensington. Museums Journal 35(4) 1935 p.113-120.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. ; British Association for the Advancement of Science. On a gravitational survey by means of the Eotvos Torsion Balance in the neighbourhood of Drumry, Glasgow. Report of the British Association Meeting 1928 - Sectional transactions C - Geology p.546-547.

McLintock, W.F.P. On Datolite from the Lizard district, Cornwall. Mineralogical Magazine 15(72) 1910 p.407-414.

McLintock, W.F.P. (1932). On the metamorphism produced by the combustion of hydrocarbons in the Tertiary sediments of south-west Persia. Mineralogical Magazine Vol 23 pt/no 139 (1932) p.207-226 (1932) ; p.207-226.

McLintock, W.F.P. (1923). On the occurrence of petalite and pneumatolytic apatite in the Meldon aplite, Okehampton, Devonshire. Mineralogical Magazine Vol 20 pt/no 103 (1923) p.140-150 (1923) ; p.140-150.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Ennos, F.R. On the structure and composition of the Strathmore meteorite. Mineralogical Magazine 19(98) 1922 p.323-329.

McLintock, W.F.P. (1915). On the zeolites and associated minerals from the Tertiary lavas around Ben More, Mull. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Vol 51 pt/no 1 (1915) p.1-33 (1915) ; p.1-33.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Hall, T. C. F. (1912). On Topaz and Beryl from the granite of Lundy Island. Mineralogical Magazine Vol 16 pt/no 76 (1912) p 294-301 (1912) ; p 294-301.

Dixey, F. ; McLintock, W.F.P. ; United Nations Scientific Conference on the Conservation and Utilization of Resources (1949). Outlook for mineral discovery in Great Britain : IN: Proceedings of the United Nations Scientific Conference on the Conservation and Utilization of Resources, 17 August - 6 September 1949, Lake Success, New York. New York: UN Dept Economic Affairs: 1951 volume 2 p.43-47.

McLintock, W.F.P. Sir John Flett : [obituary]. Nature 159(4036) 1947 p.326-327.

McLintock, W.F.P. Thomas Clifford Fitzwilliam Hall : [obituary]. Proceedings of the Geological Society of London no.1554 1957 p.145-146.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. (1928-29). The use of the torsion balance in the investigation of geological structure. Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy Vol 38 (1928-29) p.299-303 (1928-29) ; p.299-303.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. The use of the torsion balance in the investigation of geological structure in south-west Persia. Summary of Progress of the Geological Survey of GB and Museum of Practical Geology for 1926, Appendix 12, p.168-196.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. The use of torsion balance in thr investigation of geological structure. Symposium on the General Principles of Geophysical Prospecting 1929 London; London, Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 1929; p18-22.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Geological Museum ; Geological Survey of Great Britain. Geological dioramas in the Museum of Practical Geology. Museums Journal 36(3) 1936 p.89-94.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. ; Congres International de Forage (1929). Communication sur les etudes geophysiques en Grande-Bretagne. Paper at: 2nd Congres International de Forage, 16-23 September, 1929, Paris (1929).


Lees, G.M. ; Taitt, A.H. ; Stubblefield, C.J. ; McLintock, W.F.P. The geological results of the search for oilfields in Great Britain : [with discussion]. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London 101(3/4) 1945 p.255-317.

McLintock, W.F.P. ; Phemister, J. Geophysical work in Great Britain. Journal of the Institution of Petroleum Technologists 15(76) 1929 p.563-568.

BGS archives[edit]

Ref No Title Description
GSM/DR/By Edward B.Bailey Bailey joined the Survey in 1902 and was immediately sent to Scotland.He became District Geologist in 1919 but following disagreements with Flett and his removal from the Highlands to work on the Ayrshire coalfields Bailey left the Survey in 1929 to take up the Chair of Geology at Glasgow University. In April 1937 Bailey returned to the Survey as Director. He appinted McLintock as Deputy Director to undertake all administrative work and established a more rational District organisation by dividing the country into six districts and allowing the District Geologists greater control within their regions. He closed the small district offices in York and ? though Manchester and Newcastle remained.

WW1 interrupted much of the work of the Survey and Bailey served in France, losing one eye.

GSM/DR/Ml W.F.P.McLintock William Francis Porter McLintock joined the Survey in 1907 as Assistant Curator and transferred to the Royal Scottish Museum in 1921. He returned to the Survey in 1922 as Curator and Librarian and remained in this post until he became Director in 1945. He accompanied Flett in 1925 on a tour of European museums as a prelude to the move of the Geological Museum to Exhibition Rd. In 1926 he joined Phemister in an experimental trip to Persia to test the torsion balance in mapping gravity contours. This was the beginning of geophysics for the Survey.
GSM/DR/Ml/A/1 Correspondence including letters to Flett, Kitchin, Phemister, and H.H.Thomas. Also large... 3 files numbered i, ii and iii
GSM/DR/Pu William John Pugh Pugh became Director in 1950 on the retirement of McLintock. He had been Professor of Geology at Manchester and was unusual as an external appointment.
GSM/GL/Bm/1 Correspondence: letters to H.A.Allen, R.Crookall, J.S.Flett, J.A.Howe, F.L.Kitchin, W.F.P.McLintock, J.Pringle, B.Smith and C.J.Stubblefield. Some letters to Bromehead.
GSM/GL/Jn/1 Correspondence: letters to E.E.L.Dixon, T.N.George, F.L.Kitchin, W.F.P.McLintock, W.J.Pugh, A.Strahan and H.H.Thomas
GSM/GL/Ta/3 Correspondence; letters to Flett, Howe, Kitchin, McLintock and H.H.Thomas
GSM/GX/Z/216 McLintock, W F P

William Francis Porter McLintock as Director of the Survey[edit]

Extract from: From: Wilson, H.E. Down to earth - one hundred and fifty years of the British Geological Survey. Edinburgh:Scottish Academic Press, 1985. [In all directions: developments under Sir Henry's fourteen successors In all directions: developments under Sir Henry's fourteen successors]

When Bailey retired in 1945 he was succeeded by William Francis Porter McLintock. McLintock's regime was certainly a milestone in G.S.M's. history. The rehabilitation of the Museum and office had to be effected and the dispersed collections and library had to be reassembled. Staff recruitment and publication of Maps and Memoirs was resumed.

The International Geological Congress, originally planned for 1940 with McLintock as Secretary, was held in 1948, with Butler, his successor as Curator, acting as Joint Secretary, Eastwood as Excursions Secretary and with many GSM officers leading excursions.

On McLintock's accession the post of Deputy Director was reduced to that of a third Assistant Director and was filled by James Phemister, Petrographer since 1935 and a Scot, like McLintock. The law of the Scottish Succession' was commented on rather bitterly by English staff — though, in fact, T.H. Whitehead, an Englishman, had succeeded Murray Macgregor in Edinburgh, to the loud public protests of Archie Lamont, a well known Scottish nationalist and geologist!

McLintock was a dour Scot who was regarded with respect by his junior staff, despite his biting tongue, but with some askance by his contemporaries because of what they regarded as his failure to pull his weight during the war. In the post-war period, however, he was an effective and resolute Director who kept DSIR in check and retained the autonomy of the Directorship during a period when the future of an independent Survey was at risk. Though awarded a C.B. in 1951 he was the first Director, save for the short-lived Smith, not to be knighted. Some say that his acid tongue influenced his masters; some that he tried too hard. In the 1930's a somewhat evangelical member of the then Curator's staff retired and in his farewell speech referred to McLintock as having a heart 'black as the ace of spades'!

By the end of McLintock's reign the Survey had returned to its pre-war pattern of basic mapping, the only new feature being the Special Investigation Division (see p.163) headed by Charles Davidson. The Director had three Assistants — one in Scotland, one in charge of fieldwork in most of England and Wales, a third responsible for the Museum, Petrology, Palaeontology, S.E. England, Northern Ireland and Administration — and twelve District Geologists.

When McLintock retired in 1950 it seemed probable that Phemister would succeed him, for he had been the administrative lynch-pin for the last five years, but the law of the Scottish succession had been overturned and that of the Welsh had come into force. Presumably the new Director was selected by the Secretary of D.S.I .R. after consultation with the Geological Survey Board and its Chairman, Sir Arthur Trueman (1894-1953), then Professor of Geology at Glasgow. Perhaps the presence on the Board of Phemister's brother, Prof. T. C. Phemister, was a contra-indication; perhaps the anti-Scots lobby was able to make its voice heard; maybe the influence of O. T. Jones, Professor at Cambridge, was effective; but to the astonishment of the staff the new incumbent was named as William John Pugh (1892-1974), Professor at Manchester.