Editing A sequence-stratigraphy scheme of the Late Carboniferous, southern North Sea, Anglo-Dutch sector

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The southern North Sea gas basin is one of many depositional basins throughout the UK and northwest Europe where substantial thicknesses of Late Carboniferous rocks are preserved. In this basin, Carboniferous rocks occur beneath a considerable overburden of Permian, Mesozoic and Tertiary strata. The basin is located over a large area of the Anglo-Dutch sector south of the mid-North Sea High, in UK quadrants 43–53 and Netherlands quadrants D–S ([[:File:YGS_CHR_06_ASEQ_FIG_01.jpg|Figure 1]]). The offshore succession has been penetrated by many wells with wireline logs, and most of these data are now in the public domain (e.g. Cameron 1993 and Van Adrichem Boogaert & Kouwe 1993).
 
The southern North Sea gas basin is one of many depositional basins throughout the UK and northwest Europe where substantial thicknesses of Late Carboniferous rocks are preserved. In this basin, Carboniferous rocks occur beneath a considerable overburden of Permian, Mesozoic and Tertiary strata. The basin is located over a large area of the Anglo-Dutch sector south of the mid-North Sea High, in UK quadrants 43–53 and Netherlands quadrants D–S ([[:File:YGS_CHR_06_ASEQ_FIG_01.jpg|Figure 1]]). The offshore succession has been penetrated by many wells with wireline logs, and most of these data are now in the public domain (e.g. Cameron 1993 and Van Adrichem Boogaert & Kouwe 1993).
  
The authors have studied about 80 wells from the Anglo-Dutch sector. Specific details on these cannot be provided at the moment, since analysis of many wells, including many in the public domain, was carried out in the course of industry-contracted studies or unpublished non-exclusive industry reports. However, interpreted sedimentological and palynological data are presented on two public domain wells, 44/22-1 and 44/27-1. These wells penetrated extensive thicknesses of Late Carboniferous rocks, 44/22-1 from Namurian to Bolsovian in age and 44/27-1 from Langsettian to Westphalian D, and together they illustrate most of the Westphalian succession of the southern North Sea. Thus, these wells provide for the Westphalian of the southern North Sea, reference sections of their component systems tracts and depositional units.
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The authors have studied about 80 wells from the AngloDutch sector. Specific details on these cannot be provided at the moment, since analysis of many wells, including many in the public domain, was carried out in the course of industry-contracted studies or unpublished non-exclusive industry reports. However, interpreted sedimentological and palynological data are presented on two public domain wells, 44/22-1 and 44/27-1. These wells penetrated extensive thicknesses of Late Carboniferous rocks, 44/22-1 from Namurian to Bolsovian in age and 44/27-1 from Langsettian to Westphalian D, and together they illustrate most of the Westphalian succession of the southern North Sea. Thus, these wells provide for the Westphalian of the southern North Sea, reference sections of their component systems tracts and depositional units.
  
 
Until recently, Westphalian rocks in Britain and the adjacent offshore areas were collectively referred to as Coal Measures. The term has now been replaced by more formal lithostratigraphical classifications: Pennine Coal Measures and Warwickshire groups on shore (Waters et al. in press) and Coneybeare Group off shore (Cameron 1993). However, it has been found convenient to retain the older term in this account for descriptive purposes.
 
Until recently, Westphalian rocks in Britain and the adjacent offshore areas were collectively referred to as Coal Measures. The term has now been replaced by more formal lithostratigraphical classifications: Pennine Coal Measures and Warwickshire groups on shore (Waters et al. in press) and Coneybeare Group off shore (Cameron 1993). However, it has been found convenient to retain the older term in this account for descriptive purposes.
 
 
== 1. Basin setting ==
 
== 1. Basin setting ==
  

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