Editing A sequence-stratigraphy scheme of the Late Carboniferous, southern North Sea, Anglo-Dutch sector

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The Wales–Brabant Island that formed the southwestern boundary of the Anglo-Dutch Southern North Sea Basin was an area of subdued topography throughout much of Westphalian time. It has been generally considered as being a limited source of detritus to the basin except in southerly areas (Kirk 1989, Besly 1990, Fraser & Gawthorpe 1990, Quirk 1993). However, Hallsworth & Chisholm (2000) and Morton et al. (2005) have presented evidence that sediment from this source was more widely dispersed from Late Duckmantian times onwards. Southerly derived detritus is also relatively abundant in The Netherlands (Collinson et al. 1993). Evidence for a major westerly source of detritus in the Westphalian has been found in northern England (Hallsworth & Chisholm 2000), but so far this is unknown off shore.
 
The Wales–Brabant Island that formed the southwestern boundary of the Anglo-Dutch Southern North Sea Basin was an area of subdued topography throughout much of Westphalian time. It has been generally considered as being a limited source of detritus to the basin except in southerly areas (Kirk 1989, Besly 1990, Fraser & Gawthorpe 1990, Quirk 1993). However, Hallsworth & Chisholm (2000) and Morton et al. (2005) have presented evidence that sediment from this source was more widely dispersed from Late Duckmantian times onwards. Southerly derived detritus is also relatively abundant in The Netherlands (Collinson et al. 1993). Evidence for a major westerly source of detritus in the Westphalian has been found in northern England (Hallsworth & Chisholm 2000), but so far this is unknown off shore.
  
The Langsettian to Bolsovian (Westphalian A to C) of the UK and the southern North Sea is an overall regressive succession laid down during a period of sustained non-marine sedimentation, even though global sea levels were relatively high. It provides an opportunity to study the effects of sea-level changes within a mainly non-marine setting. This setting is often poorly illustrated on the landward side of many sequence-stratigraphy diagrams that deal mainly with shelfal and deepwater depositional systems (i.e. to the far left of the “slug” diagram, ''sensu ''Vail et al. 1977). A transition zone to the marine realm is not seen in the depositional facies of the Coal Measures. Such transitional facies lay outside the present erosional limits of the basin area. Marine incursions were too rapid and brief to develop shoreline facies within the basin. Yet sea-level change over such a low-lying region influenced sedimentation over many thousands of square kilometres throughout a basin that had little internal topographic relief.
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The Langsettian to Bolsovian (Westphalian A to C) of the UK and the southern North Sea is an overall regressive succession laid down during a period of sustained non-marine sedimentation, even though global sea levels were relatively high. It provides an opportunity to study the effects of sea-level changes within a mainly non-marine setting. This setting is often poorly illustrated on the landward side of many sequence-stratigraphy diagrams that deal mainly with shelfal and deepwater depositional systems (i.e. to the far left of the “slug” diagram, ''sensu ''Vail et al. 1977). A transition zone to the marine realm is not seen in the depositional facies of the Coal Measures. Such transitional facies lay outside the present erosional limits of the basin area.
  
 
'''[[:File:YGS_CHR_06_ASEQ_TAB_01.jpg|Table 1]] Summary of Late Carboniferous sedimentary facies.'''
 
'''[[:File:YGS_CHR_06_ASEQ_TAB_01.jpg|Table 1]] Summary of Late Carboniferous sedimentary facies.'''
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Marine incursions were too rapid and brief to develop shoreline facies within the basin. Yet sea-level change over such a low-lying region influenced sedimentation over many thousands of square kilometres throughout a basin that had little internal topographic relief.
  
 
== 2. Sedimentology ==
 
== 2. Sedimentology ==

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