Editing Basin-margin mineralisation, Cumbrian coast to Northumberland

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'''From: Stone, P, Millward, D, Young, B, Merritt, J W, Clarke, S M, McCormac, M and Lawrence, D J D. 2010. [[British regional geology: Northern England|British regional geology: Northern England]]. Fifth edition. Keyworth, Nottingham: British Geological Survey.'''
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== Maryport–Gilcrux –Stublick–Ninety Fathom Fault Zone ==
 
== Maryport–Gilcrux –Stublick–Ninety Fathom Fault Zone ==
 
[[File:P916091.jpg|thumbnail|Principal geological features of the Northern Pennine Orefield. Named localities are those mentioned in the text (after Dunham, 1990. Geology of the Northern Pennine Orefield (1). BGS Memoir). P916091.]]
 
[[File:P916091.jpg|thumbnail|Principal geological features of the Northern Pennine Orefield. Named localities are those mentioned in the text (after Dunham, 1990. Geology of the Northern Pennine Orefield (1). BGS Memoir). P916091.]]
  
An en échelon belt of faulting extends from the Cumbrian coast near Maryport to the Northumberland coast at Cullercoats. It includes the Maryport, Gilcrux, Stublick and Ninety Fathom faults, which together define the boundary between the Lake District and North Pennine blocks, and the Solway–Northumberland Trough. Baryte vein mineralisation, locally accompanied by small concentrations of base metals, is common in a belt up to about 4 km wide, associated with the Maryport–Gilcrux Fault Zone, within the Carboniferous rocks on the northern margins of the Lake District. Concentrations of baryte, accompanied by lead, zinc, copper and locally mercury mineralisation, occur in association with the Stublick Fault in the lower Carboniferous rocks of the Brampton area. Occurrences of barium and lead mineralisation, which lie close to this fault line in the Carboniferous rocks of Northumberland, include the Settlingstones and Fallowfield lead/witherite veins, which have been regarded as peripheral deposits to the Northern Pennine Orefield. Baryte mineralisation is present within the Ninety Fathom Fault in Coal Measures rocks on the Northumberland coast at Cullercoats.
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An en échelon belt of faulting extends from the Cumbrian coast near Maryport to the Northumberland coast at Cullercoats. It includes the Maryport, Gilcrux, Stublick and Ninety Fathom faults, which together define the boundary between the Lake District and North Pennine blocks, and the Solway–Northumberland Trough. Baryte vein mineralisation, locally accompanied by small concentrations of base metals, is common in a belt up to about 4 km wide, associated with the Maryport–Gilcrux Fault Zone, within the Carboniferous rocks on the northern margins of the Lake District. Concentrations of baryte, accompanied by lead, zinc, copper and locally mercury mineralisation, occur in association with the Stublick Fault in the lower Carboniferous rocks of the Brampton area. Occurrences of barium and lead mineralisation, which lie close to this fault line in the Carboniferous rocks of Northumberland, include the Settlingstones and Fallowfield lead/witherite veins, which have been regarded as peripheral deposits to the Northern Pennine Orefield. Baryte mineralisation is present within the Ninety Fathom Fault in Coal Measures rocks on the Northumberland coast at Cullercoats.
  
 
Structural and stratigraphical conditions on the southern margin of the Northumberland– Solway Trough are reminiscent of those that host the base metal deposits of central and Ireland. Hence they invite speculation that similar mineralisation may occur within Lower Carboniferous rocks at depth in northern England. The mineralisation seen at the surface today could then be the product of a partial remobilisation from deeper, concealed deposits. Although some exploration based on this model has been undertaken, no deposit has yet been identified.
 
Structural and stratigraphical conditions on the southern margin of the Northumberland– Solway Trough are reminiscent of those that host the base metal deposits of central and Ireland. Hence they invite speculation that similar mineralisation may occur within Lower Carboniferous rocks at depth in northern England. The mineralisation seen at the surface today could then be the product of a partial remobilisation from deeper, concealed deposits. Although some exploration based on this model has been undertaken, no deposit has yet been identified.

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