Editing Benjamin Neeve Peach - biographical information

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[[File:P613158.jpg|thumb|B.N.Peach.  Photograph taken c.1912. (A.G. Stenhouse). BGS Photo P613158.]]
 
 
[[File:P575813.jpg|thumb|B.N.Peach. Probably c.1862 when he first joined the Geological Survey,aged 19. BGS photo P575813.]]
 
 
 
== Benjamin Neeve Peach - biographical information ==
 
== Benjamin Neeve Peach - biographical information ==
  
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| 1926 || Obituary - Benjamin Neeve Peach. Born 6th September 1842, died 29th January 1926. Geologists Magazine. Whole Series. v. 63 p.187-190. 1926
 
| 1926 || Obituary - Benjamin Neeve Peach. Born 6th September 1842, died 29th January 1926. Geologists Magazine. Whole Series. v. 63 p.187-190. 1926
 
|-
 
|-
| 1928 || Greenly, Edward, Benjamin Neeve Peach: a study. [Obituary.]. Transactions of the Edinburgh Geological Society. v. 12 p.1-11. 1928
+
| 1928 || Greenly, Edward., . Benjamin Neeve Peach: a study. [Obituary.]. Transactions of the Edinburgh Geological Society. v. 12 p.1-11. 1928
 
|-
 
|-
 
| 1926 || Proceedings Royal Society (1926) (B.C.)
 
| 1926 || Proceedings Royal Society (1926) (B.C.)
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|-
 
|-
 
| 1926 || Geological Magazine (1926) p. 187
 
| 1926 || Geological Magazine (1926) p. 187
|-
 
| 2015 ||[http://edinburghgeolsoc.org/eg_pdfs/issue57_peach.pdf Benjamin Neeve Peach (1842-1926)]John Mendum and Anne Burgess Edinburgh Geologist No 57
 
 
|}
 
|}
  
== Photographs ==
+
== Ben Peach's Scotland, Landscape sketches by a Victorian geologist ==
 
 
A gallery of portraits and group photographs with Ben Peach in can be found on [http://geoscenic.bgs.ac.uk/asset-bank/action/quickSearch?CSRF=LsEzhK6XNQqFhPurfBgQ&newSearch=true&quickSearch=true&includeImplicitCategoryMembers=true&keywords=peach+portrait GeoScenic]
 
 
 
A gallery of his drawings and paintings can also be found on [http://geoscenic.bgs.ac.uk/asset-bank/action/browseItems?categoryId=1428 GeoScenic].
 
 
 
[[File:P612884.jpg|600px|Stack of Glencoul - watercolour sketch by Ben Peach]]
 
 
 
== Archives ==
 
A brief listing of Ben Peach related archives held at BGS. Also consult  the [https://www.bgs.ac.uk/services/NGDC/records/archive.html BGS Archives online catalogue]
 
 
 
{| class="wikitable"
 
! ARCHIVE NO !! TEMP SORT TITLE
 
|-
 
| LSA/236 || Strathpeffer mineral water supply, report by Peach and Horne.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.059 || Ben Peach - a Fishy Ditty. A song written in recognition of B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.075 || Lesmahagow in the olden time by B.N. Peach. This is a drawing in ink of two crustaceans wearing clothes meeting. The male is doffing his cap while the female curtsies.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.005 || The Merrick, a song composed and performed by B.N. Peach at the Annual Dinner of 16th February 1869.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.047 || A charcoal and colour drawing of a courting couple walking in the country. Caption reads Oh! happy love when love like this is found.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.045 || A drawing of a boat containing three men out at sea during rough weather, one of the men is being very ill over the side of the boat. The caption reads Jas. Craik proceeding to geologize the big and wee scones! Drawn by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.076 || A pencil drawing of a small dog running away from the butchers shop with sausages in its mouth hotly pursued by the Butcher, a passerby looks on. The drawing was done by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.057 || A pencil drawing of the profile of a woman entitled His ideal by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.038 || A watercolour painting of a flock of sheep on a wooded hillside.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.046 || An ink drawing of Loch Doon by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.052 || An ink drawing of some apes and monkeys. The main character is sitting smoking a pipe while another is preening him. The sketch is named Men and brethren and was drawn by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.048 || An ink drawing of two mice relaxing unaware that a cat is watching them. Caption read  Where ignorance is blind. Drawn by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/151.1 || Arthurs seat geological map by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/151.2 || Calton Hill geological map by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/328 || Highland and Southern Upland structures and movements, notes on.
 
|-
 
| LSA/167 || Highland border rocks, Southern Upland structures, ms.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.019 || Ink and colour wash painting of cliffs meeting the sea.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.005 || Ink caricature of B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/320 || Letters from A. Geikie.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/447 || Letters from A. Strahan.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/420 || Letters from A.C. Ramsay.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/382 || Letters from A.I. MacConnochie.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/520 || Letters from C. Lapworth.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/335 || Letters from C.E. Hawkins.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/272 || Letters from C.T. Clough.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/527 || Letters from C.W. Peach.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/354 || Letters from D.R. Irvine.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/246 || Letters from E. Anderson.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/255 || Letters from E. Best.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/398 || Letters from E. Newton.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/251 || Letters from G. Barrow.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/392 || Letters from H. Miller (Jun).
 
|-
 
| GSM1/478 || Letters from H.B. Woodward.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/347 || Letters from H.H. Howell.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/265 || Letters from H.M. Cadell.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/441 || Letters from H.M. Skae.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/254 || Letters from J. Bennie.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/278 || Letters from J. Croll.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/321 || Letters from J. Geikie.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/345 || Letters from J. Horne.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/377 || Letters from J. Linn.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/337 || Letters from J.B. Hill.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/463 || Letters from J.C. Ward.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/492 || Letters from J.F. Blake.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/325 || Letters from J.G. Goodchild.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/452 || Letters from J.J.H. Teall.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/284 || Letters from J.R. Dakyns.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/476 || Letters from J.S.G. Wilson.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/338 || Letters from L.W. Hinxman.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/384 || Letters from M. MacGregor.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/495 || Letters from P.B. Brodie.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/306 || Letters from R. Etheridge.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/350 || Letters from R. Hunt.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/519 || Letters from R. Kidston.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/380 || Letters from R. Lunn.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/540 || Letters from R.H. Traquair.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/355 || Letters from R.L. Jack.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/422 || Letters from T. Reeks.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/407 || Letters from various friends and colleagues.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/330 || Letters from W. Gunn.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/458 || Letters from W. Traill.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/445 || Letters from W.J. Sollas.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/248 || Letters from W.T. Aveline.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/407 || Letters to J. Horne, J.S. Flett, J. Geikie and others.
 
|-
 
| LSA/327 || Lewisian rocks affected by post-Cambrian movements, ts paper.
 
|-
 
| IGS1/602 || Manuscript on anthropods, geology and glaciation of Scotland.
 
|-
 
| GSM1/8 || Minutes on his appointment.
 
|-
 
| LSA/329 || Moine schists, origin of the: ts paper by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| IGS1/1221 || Notices of election to learned societies.
 
|-
 
| LSA/31 || Orkneys field map, holiday work by B.N. Peach and J.Horne.
 
|-
 
| GSM2/512 || Papers about the Peach and Horne memorial.
 
|-
 
| LSA/126 || Peach, B.N., field notebooks, sketchbooks, etc.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.013 || Photograph of B.N. Peach and J. Horne on board ship in 1910.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.096 || Photograph of B.N. Peach and J. Horne studying rocks.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.029 || Photograph of the entire party of the Assynt Excursion, taken outside the Inchnadamph Hotel during September 1912. Excursion of the British Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting held in Dundee.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.028 || Photograph of the Scottish Survey Officers outside the Inchnadamph Hotel, while taking part in the Assynt Excursion led by B.N.  Peach and J. Horne during September 1912. Excursion of the British Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting held in
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.004 || Photograph taken of B.N. Peach, about 1912 by A.G. Stenhouse and presented to the Survey.
 
|-
 
| IGS1/639 || Photograph.
 
|-
 
| IGS1/843 || Poem about him.
 
|-
 
| LSA/5 || Scotland one-inch sheet 39 explanation by B.N. Peach.
 
|-
 
| LSA/6 || Scotland one-inch sheets 30, 38, 39, 40 and 47 sections and explanation.
 
|-
 
| LSA/69.5 || Stirling and Clackmannan vertical sections.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.2.025 || The Assynt Excursion conducted by B.N. Peach and J. Horne from 11th to 18th September 1912 for the British Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting held in Dundee. This entry in a diary of events and travels over the week while on excursion.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.018 || Water colour painting by B.N. Peach of Quinag.
 
|-
 
| LSA/361.1.020 || Water colour painting of a landscape showing hills and loch.
 
|}
 
 
 
== Ben Peach's Scotland, landscape sketches by a Victorian geologist ==
 
  
 
This text is derived from the booklet written by Angela Anderson and published by the Institute of Geological Sciences, 1970.
 
This text is derived from the booklet written by Angela Anderson and published by the Institute of Geological Sciences, 1970.
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While this is an unnecessarily harsh judgement on Peach and ignores his capacity for meticulous and detailed work (as, for example, his Monograph on Higher Crustacea of 1908) it must be admitted that it was Horne who actually wrote the Memoirs and it is quite possible that Peach, left to himself, would never have written up his work at all! Horne, in fact, was the ideal complement to Peach. He had a logical mind and was a careful, accurate and systematic worker. Though lacking Peach’s imagination he had the capacity to organize the mapping programme and write up the memoirs afterwards.
 
While this is an unnecessarily harsh judgement on Peach and ignores his capacity for meticulous and detailed work (as, for example, his Monograph on Higher Crustacea of 1908) it must be admitted that it was Horne who actually wrote the Memoirs and it is quite possible that Peach, left to himself, would never have written up his work at all! Horne, in fact, was the ideal complement to Peach. He had a logical mind and was a careful, accurate and systematic worker. Though lacking Peach’s imagination he had the capacity to organize the mapping programme and write up the memoirs afterwards.
 
+
=
=== Northwest Highlands ===
+
== Northwest Highlands ===
  
 
Peach and Horne, who worked together for forty years, first went to the Northwest Highlands, the scene of their most famous work, in 1883. Peach was then forty years old. They were sent by Archibald Geikie to resolve a long standing controversy about the structure of the area. Murchison had believed that the fossiliferous Cambro-Ordovician Durness Limestone passed conformably upwards into the ‘Eastern’ schists of which a large part of the Northern Highlands are formed. Nicol was the main exponent of the opposition and pointed out that the metamorphosed schists must be older than the unmetamorphosed limestones and that the junction was a steep fault. Since it could easily be demonstrated in the field that the junction is almost horizontal, Murchison’s views were held to be correct. In 1883 both Calloway and Lapworth suggested that the junction was a low-angle tectonic thrust, and this idea was now being given serious consideration by Geikie. It was during their first season of field mapping in the region round Durness and Eriboll that Peach recorded the true situation. Instead of the simple conformity which Murchison had suggested, there were gigantic structures of a kind never before encountered in the British Isles. The Eastern (Moine) Schists had been thrust westwards by a series of large-scale low-angled faults over the unmoved foreland rocks of ancient Lewisian gneiss and their cover of Late Precambrian Torridonian sandstone and Cambro-Ordovician limestones. During this process a series of smaller faults (imbricate structures) had been produced en-echelon in the underlying foreland and cover rocks. The thrust zone was eventually traced in the field from Eriboll to Skye. These well exposed structures now seem easily recognizable, but it was perhaps the most spectacular discovery of all time in British geology. By 1884 Murchison’s views on the succession had to be abandoned in view of the rapidly accumulating evidence against them. Peach was somewhat reluctant to overturn Murchison’s theory, for he felt a debt of gratitude to Murchison and greatly respected the old man.
 
Peach and Horne, who worked together for forty years, first went to the Northwest Highlands, the scene of their most famous work, in 1883. Peach was then forty years old. They were sent by Archibald Geikie to resolve a long standing controversy about the structure of the area. Murchison had believed that the fossiliferous Cambro-Ordovician Durness Limestone passed conformably upwards into the ‘Eastern’ schists of which a large part of the Northern Highlands are formed. Nicol was the main exponent of the opposition and pointed out that the metamorphosed schists must be older than the unmetamorphosed limestones and that the junction was a steep fault. Since it could easily be demonstrated in the field that the junction is almost horizontal, Murchison’s views were held to be correct. In 1883 both Calloway and Lapworth suggested that the junction was a low-angle tectonic thrust, and this idea was now being given serious consideration by Geikie. It was during their first season of field mapping in the region round Durness and Eriboll that Peach recorded the true situation. Instead of the simple conformity which Murchison had suggested, there were gigantic structures of a kind never before encountered in the British Isles. The Eastern (Moine) Schists had been thrust westwards by a series of large-scale low-angled faults over the unmoved foreland rocks of ancient Lewisian gneiss and their cover of Late Precambrian Torridonian sandstone and Cambro-Ordovician limestones. During this process a series of smaller faults (imbricate structures) had been produced en-echelon in the underlying foreland and cover rocks. The thrust zone was eventually traced in the field from Eriboll to Skye. These well exposed structures now seem easily recognizable, but it was perhaps the most spectacular discovery of all time in British geology. By 1884 Murchison’s views on the succession had to be abandoned in view of the rapidly accumulating evidence against them. Peach was somewhat reluctant to overturn Murchison’s theory, for he felt a debt of gratitude to Murchison and greatly respected the old man.
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=== Retirement ===
 
=== Retirement ===
 
[[File:P585013.jpg|thumb|Ben Peach. BGS photo P585013.]]
 
  
 
Peach retired from the Geological Survey in September 1905 after serving for forty-three years. His retirement gave him time to pursue at his leisure a line of research that had always fascinated him since his early days with Huxley at the Royal School of Mines – the technical description and illustration of fossils, and in particular the Scottish Carboniferous crustaceans. Peach was a very competent palaeontologist, a fact that tends to be overshadowed by his more famous Highland work. It was he who identified most of the fossils in the Survey Memoirs, the most notable being the Lower Cambrian tribolite fauna of the Northwest Highlands and it was to be eighty years before they were redescribed. His friend and colleague Edward Greenly records how, even in the euphoric days of the Moine Thrust discovery, Peach had growled, ‘but give me something that has once been alive!’
 
Peach retired from the Geological Survey in September 1905 after serving for forty-three years. His retirement gave him time to pursue at his leisure a line of research that had always fascinated him since his early days with Huxley at the Royal School of Mines – the technical description and illustration of fossils, and in particular the Scottish Carboniferous crustaceans. Peach was a very competent palaeontologist, a fact that tends to be overshadowed by his more famous Highland work. It was he who identified most of the fossils in the Survey Memoirs, the most notable being the Lower Cambrian tribolite fauna of the Northwest Highlands and it was to be eighty years before they were redescribed. His friend and colleague Edward Greenly records how, even in the euphoric days of the Moine Thrust discovery, Peach had growled, ‘but give me something that has once been alive!’
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== Ben Peach — a fishy ditty ==
 
== Ben Peach — a fishy ditty ==
 
(Sung at the 1929 Edinburgh Geologists Annual Dinner)
 
(Sung at the 1929 Edinburgh Geologists Annual Dinner)
 
  
 
D’ye ken Ben Peach with his shoulders broad
 
D’ye ken Ben Peach with his shoulders broad
 
 
His dimpled cheeks and his smiling nod
 
His dimpled cheeks and his smiling nod
 
 
D’ye ken Ben Peach with his reel and his rod
 
D’ye ken Ben Peach with his reel and his rod
 
 
As he starts for the loch in the morning.
 
As he starts for the loch in the morning.
  
 
+
Chorus
'''Chorus'''
+
For the whirr of his reel brought the fishes from their bed
 
+
And the swish of his line high over his head
''For the whirr of his reel brought the fishes from their bed''
+
As they hurried up in shoals to be all struck dead
 
+
By a wave of his wand in the morning.
''And the swish of his line high over his head''
 
 
 
''As they hurried up in shoals to be all struck dead''
 
 
 
''By a wave of his wand in the morning.''
 
 
 
  
 
Yes, I ken Ben Peach and Jock Scott too
 
Yes, I ken Ben Peach and Jock Scott too
 
 
The mallard wing and the black Zulu
 
The mallard wing and the black Zulu
 
 
You should see Ben Peach on Loch Kylesku
 
You should see Ben Peach on Loch Kylesku
 
 
With a shark on his line in the morning.
 
With a shark on his line in the morning.
  
 
+
Chorus..... For etc
'''Chorus..... For etc'''
 
 
 
  
 
He lived at Durness for many a day
 
He lived at Durness for many a day
 
 
By the big cave of Smoo at Sango Bay
 
By the big cave of Smoo at Sango Bay
 
 
And was once nearly slain in a furious fray
 
And was once nearly slain in a furious fray
 
 
With a Frenchman at one in the morning.
 
With a Frenchman at one in the morning.
  
 
+
Chorus..... For etc
'''Chorus..... For etc'''
 
 
 
  
 
He hunted for old crabs in the Cave of Smoo
 
He hunted for old crabs in the Cave of Smoo
 
 
And for beasties long hidden from the public view
 
And for beasties long hidden from the public view
 
 
Though pickled well in lime all too hard to stew
 
Though pickled well in lime all too hard to stew
 
 
For his breakfast the following morning.
 
For his breakfast the following morning.
  
 
+
Chorus..... For etc
'''Chorus..... For etc'''
 
 
 
  
 
He tried camp life on wild Ben More
 
He tried camp life on wild Ben More
 
 
But the skies shed tears in a solid steady pour
 
But the skies shed tears in a solid steady pour
 
 
So he curled up on the floor, and gave a solemn snore
 
So he curled up on the floor, and gave a solemn snore
 
 
Till seventeen o'clock in the morning.
 
Till seventeen o'clock in the morning.
  
 
+
Chorus..... For etc
'''Chorus..... For etc'''
 
 
 
  
 
And at last he landed many a degree
 
And at last he landed many a degree
 
 
Both an F.R.S. and an LL.D.,
 
Both an F.R.S. and an LL.D.,
 
 
So here’s to the memory of B.N.P.,
 
So here’s to the memory of B.N.P.,
 
 
And the things that he caught in the morning.
 
And the things that he caught in the morning.
  
 
+
Chorus..... For etc
'''Chorus..... For etc'''
 
 
 
[[Category:British geoscientists]]
 
[[Category:Pioneers of the British Geological Survey]]
 

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