Editing Building stones in Edinburgh from the Carboniferous of the Scottish Borders and England

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== Prudham ==
 
== Prudham ==
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From the end of the 19th century, building stones were brought by rail from the north-east of England. Middle Limestone Group sandstone from Prudham, near Hexham in central Northumberland, was much used from the mid-1880s until 1970. It is a cream-coloured, slightly micaceous coarse-grained sandstone containing tiny brown specks. Fresh stone seen in the cladding above the entrance to the '''St Andrew Square Bus Station''' (121) (1970), shows brown patches and lamination. Prudham stone was used at the turn of the century for the '''Balmoral Hotel''' (2) (1902), East End, Princes Street, where its polished surface was very badly weathered, particularly the north and west elevations. Restoration of the stonework, was carried out between 1989 and 1991 using Dunhouse stone. Of all the stones used in the '''Meadows Pillars''' (158) the Prudham blocks on the east pillar are the worst affected, almost the whole worked surface having weathered away. Large quantities of Prudham stone were used in the '''Marchmont '''tenements between 1876 and 1914.
 
[[File:IS024.jpg|thumb|300px|left|McEwan Hall, Edinburgh. Carboniferous sandstones Polmaise (Stirlingshire) and Prudham (Hexham, Northumberland). Small red sandstone columns are Triassic St Bees sandstone from Corsehill (Annan). Built in 1888-1897 by Sir R. Rowand Anderson. IS024]]
 
[[File:IS024.jpg|thumb|300px|left|McEwan Hall, Edinburgh. Carboniferous sandstones Polmaise (Stirlingshire) and Prudham (Hexham, Northumberland). Small red sandstone columns are Triassic St Bees sandstone from Corsehill (Annan). Built in 1888-1897 by Sir R. Rowand Anderson. IS024]]
From the end of the 19th century, building stones were brought by rail from the north-east of England. Middle Limestone Group sandstone from Prudham, near Hexham in central Northumberland, was much used from the mid-1880s until 1970. It is a cream-coloured, slightly micaceous coarse-grained sandstone containing tiny brown specks. Fresh stone seen in the cladding above the entrance to the '''St Andrew Square Bus Station''' (121) (1970), shows brown patches and lamination. Prudham stone was used at the turn of the century for the '''Balmoral Hotel''' (2) (1902), East End, Princes Street, where its polished surface was very badly weathered, particularly the north and west elevations. Restoration of the stonework, was carried out between 1989 and 1991 using Dunhouse stone. Of all the stones used in the '''Meadows Pillars''' (158) the Prudham blocks on the east pillar are the worst affected, almost the whole worked surface having weathered away. Large quantities of Prudham stone were used in the '''Marchmont '''tenements between 1876 and 1914.
 
 
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