Editing Building stones of Edinburgh: tests and properties

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A second criticism is that stones, which have proved satisfactory in practice, do not survive more than half the cycles and there is not a clear and simple distinction between the satisfactory and the unsatisfactory. Stones that have proved satisfactory in use may appear well down the range of possible values. Reference to Appendix 5 shows the validity of this criticism. The nature of the formation of stone is such that it grades continuously from the weak to the durable and tests reflect this gradation. The saturated sulphate solution provides a particularly severe test and an unsuitable facing stone is likely to show its weaknesses at a very early stage in the test, at as few as two or three cycles. Examples of such unsatisfactory stones have not been identified in use in Edinburgh and therefore do not appear in the data for comparison.
 
A second criticism is that stones, which have proved satisfactory in practice, do not survive more than half the cycles and there is not a clear and simple distinction between the satisfactory and the unsatisfactory. Stones that have proved satisfactory in use may appear well down the range of possible values. Reference to Appendix 5 shows the validity of this criticism. The nature of the formation of stone is such that it grades continuously from the weak to the durable and tests reflect this gradation. The saturated sulphate solution provides a particularly severe test and an unsuitable facing stone is likely to show its weaknesses at a very early stage in the test, at as few as two or three cycles. Examples of such unsatisfactory stones have not been identified in use in Edinburgh and therefore do not appear in the data for comparison.
  
== The mechanical properties of stone strength tests ==
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== The Mechanical properties of stone strength tests ==
 
The property most usually quoted historically is that of compressive strength. Compressive in this context is the means of applying the load by compression along one axis, between the platens of a testing machine; the uniaxial or unconfined compression test. Brittle rocks are not easily compressed and the specimen fails primarily due to shear and, possibly, tensile stresses induced by the application of the compressive load. The maximum load and the nature of the failure depend upon the shape of the specimen and the characteristics of the testing machine. The compression test' requires careful specimen preparation, a powerful testing-machine and is not suitable for all types of rock.
 
The property most usually quoted historically is that of compressive strength. Compressive in this context is the means of applying the load by compression along one axis, between the platens of a testing machine; the uniaxial or unconfined compression test. Brittle rocks are not easily compressed and the specimen fails primarily due to shear and, possibly, tensile stresses induced by the application of the compressive load. The maximum load and the nature of the failure depend upon the shape of the specimen and the characteristics of the testing machine. The compression test' requires careful specimen preparation, a powerful testing-machine and is not suitable for all types of rock.
  

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