Difference between revisions of "Charles Edward Fox-Strangways F.G.S."

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{{Pioneers}}
 
== Images ==
 
== Images ==
 
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== BGS archives ==
 
== BGS archives ==
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{| class="wikitable"
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! Ref No !! Title !! Description
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| GSM/DC/A/C/7/483,504 || C E Fox Strangways: Letter on his appointment. ||
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| GSM/DC/A/C/24/289,291,301,304,314,317 || C E Fox-Strangways: Letter on his promotion. ||
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|-
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| GSM/GL/Fx || C E Fox-Strangways || Joined the Survey in 1867. He was the joint author (with H.B.Woodward) of the second of the...
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| GSM/GL/Fx/12 || Profile of C.E. Fox-Strangways || From the Leicester Guardian. [This is not an obituary as Fox-Strangways did not die until 1910]
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| 1910 || Died March 5th.
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|}
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== Charles Edward Fox-Strangways 1844-1910 ==
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'''Extract with permission of the author from: Cooper A.H. Yorkshire geology as seen through the eyes of notable British Geological Survey geologists 1862-200046-67 in Myerscough, R and Wallace, V. Famous Geologists of Yorkshire. York. ISBN 978-1-906604-58-5. [http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/514376/1/Cooper%202016%20Yorkshire%20geology%20by%20notable%20British%20Geological%20Survey%20geologists%20NORA.pdf PDF on NORA]'''
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Fox-Strangways hailed from Reive near Exeter. The son of the Rev Henry Fox-Strangways, he was educated at Eton and went on to study chemistry, mineralogy and physics at the University of Gottingen . While there, war was declared in 1866 between Prussia and Austria, and he is recorded to have assisted Sartorius von Waltershausen, the professor of geology and mineralogy, to bury his precious collection of minerals, so as to prevent them falling into the hands of the belligerents .  He joined the Survey in 1867 and initially worked on the Carboniferous rocks of Yorkshire around Todmorden, Halifax and Bradford. From here he moved on to the Harrogate anticline and Knaresborough areas studying not only the stratigraphy and structure, but also the mineral springs that made Harrogate famous as a spa town. His surveying career then carried him across the Vale of York on to the Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of the North York Moors and Wolds.  He wrote some 22 memoirs including many for Yorkshire ([http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/514376/1/Cooper%202016%20Yorkshire%20geology%20by%20notable%20British%20Geological%20Survey%20geologists%20NORA.pdf Table 1]) and two volumes on the Jurassic rocks of Britain. These and his scientific publications attest to a productive and innovative geologist who laid the foundations for much of the understanding of Yorkshire geology that went on past his retirement in 1904. He died at his desk in 1910 while completing an exhaustive bibliography of Yorkshire Geology that was completed by T Sheppard and published in 1915.
  
 
[[Category:Pioneers of the British Geological Survey]]
 
[[Category:Pioneers of the British Geological Survey]]

Latest revision as of 23:25, 31 August 2020

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Images[edit]

Timeline[edit]

Date Details
1844 Born February 13th at Reive near Exeter. Son of Rev. Henry Fox-Strangways. Educated at Eton and University of Gottingen.
1867 Appointed Assistant Geologist of the Geological Survey.
1867 Fieldwork in West Yorkshire near Todmorden, and near Ingleton. Yorkshire Coalfield – Harrogate – across Vale of York to East Yorkshire. (For memoirs see Geological Magazine 1910, p. 237).
1889 Transferred to Midland Counties. Lived in Leicester till retirement. Memoir on Leicestershire Coalfield.
1892 General memoir on Jurassic rocks of Yorkshire.
1901 Promoted to District Geologist.
Had important share in compiling “Bibliography of Yorkshire Geology”. Published by the Yorkshire Geological Society 1915.
1910 Died March 5th.

Biographies and obituaries[edit]

Obituary - Charles Edward Fox-Strangways, F.G.S. Born 13th February 1844, died 5th March 1910. Geologists Magazine. New Series. v. 7 p.235-238. 1910

Lamplugh, G.W. Obituary - Charles Fox-Strangways, F.G.S. (1844-1910). Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society. v. 17 p.156-158. 1910

Watts, W.W. Obituary - Charles Edward Fox-Strangways. [In Anniversary Address.]. Proceedings of the Geological Society in Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society. v. 67 p.lv-lvi. 1911

Geology of Yorkshire, Kendall and Wroot. p. 307.

Charles Edward Fox-Strangways (1844-1910) Geologist and Honorary Member of the YPS

Charles Edward Fox-Strangways (1844 - 1910) — Wikitree entry

Publications[edit]

List of Memoirs and papers: Geological Magazine (1910) p. 237-8.

181 works listed in the BGS Library catalogue.

BGS archives[edit]

Ref No Title Description
GSM/DC/A/C/7/483,504 C E Fox Strangways: Letter on his appointment.
GSM/DC/A/C/24/289,291,301,304,314,317 C E Fox-Strangways: Letter on his promotion.
GSM/GL/Fx C E Fox-Strangways Joined the Survey in 1867. He was the joint author (with H.B.Woodward) of the second of the...
GSM/GL/Fx/12 Profile of C.E. Fox-Strangways From the Leicester Guardian. [This is not an obituary as Fox-Strangways did not die until 1910]
1910 Died March 5th.

Charles Edward Fox-Strangways 1844-1910[edit]

Extract with permission of the author from: Cooper A.H. Yorkshire geology as seen through the eyes of notable British Geological Survey geologists 1862-200046-67 in Myerscough, R and Wallace, V. Famous Geologists of Yorkshire. York. ISBN 978-1-906604-58-5. PDF on NORA

Fox-Strangways hailed from Reive near Exeter. The son of the Rev Henry Fox-Strangways, he was educated at Eton and went on to study chemistry, mineralogy and physics at the University of Gottingen . While there, war was declared in 1866 between Prussia and Austria, and he is recorded to have assisted Sartorius von Waltershausen, the professor of geology and mineralogy, to bury his precious collection of minerals, so as to prevent them falling into the hands of the belligerents . He joined the Survey in 1867 and initially worked on the Carboniferous rocks of Yorkshire around Todmorden, Halifax and Bradford. From here he moved on to the Harrogate anticline and Knaresborough areas studying not only the stratigraphy and structure, but also the mineral springs that made Harrogate famous as a spa town. His surveying career then carried him across the Vale of York on to the Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of the North York Moors and Wolds. He wrote some 22 memoirs including many for Yorkshire (Table 1) and two volumes on the Jurassic rocks of Britain. These and his scientific publications attest to a productive and innovative geologist who laid the foundations for much of the understanding of Yorkshire geology that went on past his retirement in 1904. He died at his desk in 1910 while completing an exhaustive bibliography of Yorkshire Geology that was completed by T Sheppard and published in 1915.