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=== Introduction ===
 
=== Introduction ===
[[File:P000584.jpg|400px|thumbnail|right|The Eildon Hills, near Melrose, from the north-west. Roxburghshire. The hills are the denuded remains of a composite laccolith of trachyte rocks intruded into the Upper Old Red Sandstone in Carboniferous times. Much of Eildon Wester and Eildon Mid is formed by riebeckite-felsite disposed in two layers. The summit of Mid Hill is occupied by orthophyric riebeckite-trachyte overlying a sheet of augite-olivine-trachyte. Eildon Hill North consists of porphyritic and non-porphyritic sanidine-trachyte. A laccolith is an intrusive dome-like mass of igneous rock which arches the overlying sediments and has a flat floor. If there have been several phases of emplacement of different materials then it is said to be composite. P000584]]Topographically, the Eildon Hills form a pleasing profile bordering the south side of the Tweed valley beside the romantic burgh of Melrose in Roxburgh District. The hills consist of three principal summits rising above the cultivated lands and groves of the countryside. Eildon Mid Hill reaches a height of 420 m above sea-level while the North and Wester hills attain heights of 402 m and 368 m respectively. A smaller hill, known as Little Hill, lies on the west side of the valley between the Mid and Wester hills. Geologically, the Eildons have been regarded as the remnant of a large composite laccolith consisting of several sheets of intermediate and acid rocks intruded into sedimentary strata of the Upper Old Red Sandstone and thus of later date, probably early Carboniferous. Little Hill is a small volcanic vent of agglomerate, with an intruded plug consisting of two types of basalt, and almost certainly of later date than the acid rocks of the Eildons. A quarry in the great volcanic pipe at Chiefswood, to the south-west of Melrose, and another quarry at Bowdenmoor usually have been regarded by the authors as part of their excursion to the Eildon Hills and are dealt with in this itinerary. A comprehensive account of the igneous rocks of the Melrose district was published by Lady McRobert in 1914 and quotations in the text are from her paper.  
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[[File:P000584.jpg|350px|thumbnail|right|The Eildon Hills, near Melrose, from the north-west. Roxburghshire. The hills are the denuded remains of a composite laccolith of trachyte rocks intruded into the Upper Old Red Sandstone in Carboniferous times. Much of Eildon Wester and Eildon Mid is formed by riebeckite-felsite disposed in two layers. The summit of Mid Hill is occupied by orthophyric riebeckite-trachyte overlying a sheet of augite-olivine-trachyte. Eildon Hill North consists of porphyritic and non-porphyritic sanidine-trachyte. A laccolith is an intrusive dome-like mass of igneous rock which arches the overlying sediments and has a flat floor. If there have been several phases of emplacement of different materials then it is said to be composite. P000584]]Topographically, the Eildon Hills form a pleasing profile bordering the south side of the Tweed valley beside the romantic burgh of Melrose in Roxburgh District. The hills consist of three principal summits rising above the cultivated lands and groves of the countryside. Eildon Mid Hill reaches a height of 420 m above sea-level while the North and Wester hills attain heights of 402 m and 368 m respectively. A smaller hill, known as Little Hill, lies on the west side of the valley between the Mid and Wester hills. Geologically, the Eildons have been regarded as the remnant of a large composite laccolith consisting of several sheets of intermediate and acid rocks intruded into sedimentary strata of the Upper Old Red Sandstone and thus of later date, probably early Carboniferous. Little Hill is a small volcanic vent of agglomerate, with an intruded plug consisting of two types of basalt, and almost certainly of later date than the acid rocks of the Eildons. A quarry in the great volcanic pipe at Chiefswood, to the south-west of Melrose, and another quarry at Bowdenmoor usually have been regarded by the authors as part of their excursion to the Eildon Hills and are dealt with in this itinerary. A comprehensive account of the igneous rocks of the Melrose district was published by Lady McRobert in 1914 and quotations in the text are from her paper.  
  
 
The excursion starts from Melrose which lies by the River Tweed on the A72 road east of Galashiels, and near the A7 Edinburgh-Hawick road. For a party the best transport arrangement for this excursion is travel by private coach, and this account is described accordingly. A full day is required to complete the itinerary, but if a shorter day is desired one of the following abridged programmes is suggested:  
 
The excursion starts from Melrose which lies by the River Tweed on the A72 road east of Galashiels, and near the A7 Edinburgh-Hawick road. For a party the best transport arrangement for this excursion is travel by private coach, and this account is described accordingly. A full day is required to complete the itinerary, but if a shorter day is desired one of the following abridged programmes is suggested:  

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