Editing Excursion guide to the Moine geology of the Northern Highlands of Scotland

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== Foreword ==
 
== Foreword ==
 
[[File:EGS_MOI_Fig__F_01.jpg|thumbnail|Fig. F.1 Locations of the excursions on a generalized geological map of the Northern Highlands of Scotland.]]
 
[[File:EGS_MOI_Fig__F_01.jpg|thumbnail|Fig. F.1 Locations of the excursions on a generalized geological map of the Northern Highlands of Scotland.]]
The Neoproterozoic rocks of the Moine Supergroup underlie an extensive tract of the Lower Palaeozoic Caledonian mountain belt in NW Scotland. The region contains numerous classic geological localities that have been illustrated in geology textbooks for many years. The superb geology of the region continues to attract field parties of amateur groups, undergraduate students and international scientists. This guide is a new edition of the first ‘Moine fieldguide’ that was published by Scottish Academic Press in 1988 on behalf of the Edinburgh and Glasgow geological societies, and is now more or less unavailable. As was the case with the first guide, the aim is to provide an up-to-date summary of the geological evolution of the Moine Supergroup, illustrated by the field evidence on which it is based. Owners of the first fieldguide will see that a number of excursions have survived more or less intact, although at a minimum all have been updated to take account of new geological information, as well as any new outcrops and/or additional constraints on access. Other excursions have been more or less completely rewritten. A key feature of this second edition is the inclusion of new excursions to the Ross of Mull, West Glenelg and Loch Hourn, East Glenelg and Loch Duich, Glen Strathfarrar and Loch Monar, South and Central Sutherland, Durness, and the Great Glen [[Media:EGS_MOI_Fig__F_01.jpg|(Fig. F.1)]].
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Neoproterozoic rocks of the Moine Supergroup underlie an extensive tract of the Lower Palaeozoic Caledonian mountain belt in NW Scotland. The region contains numerous classic geological localities that have been illustrated in geology textbooks for many years. The superb geology of the region continues to attract field parties of amateur groups, undergraduate students and international scientists. This guide is a new edition of the first ‘Moine fieldguide’ that was published by Scottish Academic Press in 1988 on behalf of the Edinburgh and Glasgow geological societies, and is now more or less unavailable. As was the case with the first guide, the aim is to provide an up-to-date summary of the geological evolution of the Moine Supergroup, illustrated by the field evidence on which it is based. Owners of the first fieldguide will see that a number of excursions have survived more or less intact, although at a minimum all have been updated to take account of new geological information, as well as any new outcrops and/or additional constraints on access. Other excursions have been more or less completely rewritten. A key feature of this second edition is the inclusion of new excursions to the Ross of Mull, West Glenelg and Loch Hourn, East Glenelg and Loch Duich, Glen Strathfarrar and Loch Monar, South and Central Sutherland, Durness, and the Great Glen [[Media:EGS_MOI_Fig__F_01.jpg|(Fig. F.1)]].
  
 
The editors acknowledge the substantial contributions made by Iain Allison and the late Frank May who co-edited the first ‘Moine fieldguide’. The authors of the various excursions acknowledge discussions with colleagues too numerous to mention, and also the role of the Natural Environment Research Council who funded studentships which allowed much of the research reported here to be carried out.
 
The editors acknowledge the substantial contributions made by Iain Allison and the late Frank May who co-edited the first ‘Moine fieldguide’. The authors of the various excursions acknowledge discussions with colleagues too numerous to mention, and also the role of the Natural Environment Research Council who funded studentships which allowed much of the research reported here to be carried out.

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