Excursion to Eridge and Tunbridge Wells. Saturday, May 22nd, 1909 - Geologists' Association excursion

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Geologists' Association Circular No. 108 Session 1908 1909 p.5. Excursion to Eridge and Tunbridge Wells. Saturday, May 22nd, 1909.

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Page 71 P805333 The Tunbridge Wells Sands of the Upper Division of the Hastings Sand forms a plateau from 4 to 500 ft above sea level. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909. The uppermost 30 ft being consolidated into a massive sand rock which stands out as'cliffs' and isolated stacks. This thick bedded sandstone forms at Eridge a long section with a vertical face and many straight cut master joints.
Page 71 P805334 The Tunbridge Wells Sands of the Upper Division of the Hastings Sand forms a plateau from 4 to 500 ft above sea level. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909. The uppermost 30 ft being consolidated into a massive sand rock which stands out as 'cliffs' and isolated stacks. This thick bedded sandstone forms at Eridge a long section with a vertical face and many straight cut master joints.
Page 71 P805335 The Tunbridge Wells Sands of the Upper Division of the Hastings Sand forms a plateau from 4 to 500 ft above sea level. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909. The uppermost 30 ft being consolidated into a massive sand rock which stands out as 'cliffs' and isolated stacks. This thick bedded sandstone forms at Eridge a long section with a vertical face and many straight cut master joints.
Page 71 P805336 The Tunbridge Wells Sands of the Upper Division of the Hastings Sand forms a plateau from 4 to 500 ft above sea level. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909. The uppermost 30 ft being consolidated into a massive sand rock which stands out as 'cliffs' and isolated stacks. This thick bedded sandstone forms at Eridge a long section with a vertical face and many straight cut master joints.
Page 73 P805337 Joint face. These joints or vertical fissures were produced originally by shrinkage which have become enlarged by the action of wind and rain. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909.
Page 73 P805338 The undercutting of many of the rocks is due to the softer nature of some layers which are more easily worn away. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909.
Page 73 P805339 Harrison's Rocks. Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909.
Page 73 P805340 Excursion to Eridge, May 22nd 1909.