Difference between revisions of "Excursion to Ewell and Cheam. Saturday, July 6th, 1912 - Geologists' Association excursion"

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Geologists' Association Circular No. 146. Session 1911–1912. p.2-3[edit]

Excursion to Ewell and Cheam. Saturday, July 6th, 1912. (Transcription from GA Circular No. 146. Session 1911–1912. p.2-3.)[edit]

DIRECTOR: W. WHITAKER, F.R S.

EXCURSION SECRETARY: A. L. LEACH, Giltar, Shrewsbury Lane, Plumstead, S.E.

Leave London Bridge (LB. & S.C.R.) by 2.33 train, due at Ewell 3.19. To obtain cheap return tickets, price about is. sd., meet Mr. Leach under clock inside station not later than 2.20.

Walk to the springs forming the head of the Hog's Mill stream, in the village, where the occurrence of springs along the junction of the Tertiary Beds and the Chalk in Surrey will be noticed.

Go on to Nonsuch Pottery, on the north-eastern side of the village, where the Reading Beds are well shown, and have been worked for a long time.

Then eastward, by Nonsuch Park to Cheam where there is a section through Reading Beds to Thanet Sand. Some patches of gravel also occur.

Then on, farther eastward, to Lower Cheam, where there are again sections of the Reading Beds, whilst at one spot oyster-shells have been seen in what what is presumably the basement-bed of the London Clay, the only evidence of that bed noticed in these parts.

It is believed that one section at Cheam has not been visited by the Association.

The walk will be extended to Sutton, where tea wilt be arranged.

Return trains to London Bridge from Sutton Station at 7.13 (due at London Bridge 7.37), and 7.54 (due at London Bridge 8.31).

Total walking distance about tour miles.

REFERENCES.

Geological Survey Map, Sheet 3 (Drift). London District.

New Ordnance Survey Map, Sheet 271.

1886. FRENCH, H. H.—"Excursion to Ewell and Epsom." Proc. Geol. Assoc., vol. xi, p. 332, price 1s.

1889. WHITAKER, W.—"Geology of London and the Thames Valley." Vol. i, pp. 5, 109, 126, 241, 489.

1901. STEBBING, W. P. D.—"Excursion to Cheam, Ewell, and Epsom." Proc. Geol. Assoc., vol. xvii, pt. 4, price 1s.

Images[edit]

List of photographs[edit]

Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912[edit]

Page 105 P805539 Slickensided Chalk in a pit a little west of Nonsuch Farm, Ewell. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. In this pit was seen a fine example of horizontal slickensides, it covered a surface of many square yards along the prominent joint planes which run from SE to NW, the whole surface being scored by grooves owing to horizontal movement.
Page 107 P805540 Slickensided Chalk in a pit a little west of Nonsuch Farm, Ewell. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. In this pit was seen a fine example of horizontal slickensides, it covered a surface of many square yards along the prominent joint planes which run from SE to NW, the whole surface being scored by grooves owing to horizontal movement. Added note: Halfpenny = 1 inch.
Page 107 P805541 Slickensided Chalk in a pit a little west of Nonsuch Farm, Ewell. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. In this pit was seen a fine example of horizontal slickensides, it covered a surface of many square yards along the prominent joint planes which run from SE to NW, the whole surface being scored by grooves owing to horizontal movement.
Page 107 P805542 Section in Reading Beds, Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. The Reading Beds are capped by a gravelly or stony drift. The platform is a clayey greenish sand in the lower part of the Reading Beds containing numerous shark's teeth, below which is the Thanet Sands.
Page 109 P805543 Section in Reading Beds, Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. The Reading Beds are capped by a gravelly or stony drift. The platform is a clayey greenish sand in the lower part of the Reading Beds containing numerous shark's teeth, below which is the Thanet Sands.
Page 109 P805544 Illustration: Woolwich and Reading Series. Teeth of Lamna from the above Reading Clay Pit. [Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit.]. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912.
Page 109 P805545 Brickyard, Lower Cheam. Basement bed of London Clay with fragments of oyster shells. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. Added note: Oyster band.
Page 111 P805546 Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit. This well known pit is entirely in the Reading Beds but in places excavations have been carried down into the Thanet Sands. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. The Reading Clays are largely used for brickmaking, rough pottery and fire bricks and consist of alternations of valuable plastic clay of various colours, loam and sands. The bottom bed consisting of roughly laminated bluish grey clay with green sand is seen overlying the Thanet Sand.
Page 111 P805547 Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit. This well known pit is entirely in the Reading Beds but in places excavations have been carried down into the Thanet Sands. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. The Reading Clays are largely used for brickmaking, rough pottery and fire bricks and consist of alternations of valuable plastic clay of various colours, loam and sands. The bottom bed consisting of roughly laminated bluish grey clay with green sand is seen overlying the Thanet Sand.
Page 111 P805548 Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit. This well known pit is entirely in the Reading Beds but in places excavations have been carried down into the Thanet Sands. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. The Reading Clays are largely used for brickmaking, rough pottery and fire bricks and consist of alternations of valuable plastic clay of various colours, loam and sands. The bottom bed consisting of roughly laminated bluish grey clay with green sand is seen overlying the Thanet Sand.
Page 111 P805549 Nonsuch Pottery Clay Pit. This well known pit is entirely in the Reading Beds but in places excavations have been carried down into the Thanet Sands. Excursion to Ewell, July 6th 1912. The Reading Clays are largely used for brickmaking, rough pottery and fire bricks and consist of alternations of valuable plastic clay of various colours, loam and sands. The bottom bed consisting of roughly laminated bluish grey clay with green sand is seen overlying the Thanet Sand.