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== Excursion to Sheppey. Saturday, May 7th. (Transcription from GA Circular ) ==
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== Excursion to Sheppey. Saturday, May 7th. (Transcription from GA Circular No. 119. Session 1909–1910. p.2-3.) ==
  
 
'''DIRECTORS''': T. V. HOLMES, F.G.S., and W. WHITAKER, F.R.S.  
 
'''DIRECTORS''': T. V. HOLMES, F.G.S., and W. WHITAKER, F.R.S.  

Revision as of 08:42, 29 September 2020

P805473.jpg

Geologists' Association Circular No. 119. Session 1909–1910. p.2-3

Excursion to Sheppey. Saturday, May 7th. (Transcription from GA Circular No. 119. Session 1909–1910. p.2-3.)

DIRECTORS: T. V. HOLMES, F.G.S., and W. WHITAKER, F.R.S.

EXCURSION SECRETARY: D. LEIGHTON, 108, St. Julian's Farm Road, West Norwood, S.E.

Leave Victoria (S.E. & C.R.) by 9.43 train to Queenborough, where change to the Sheppey Light Railway, and go on to Leysdown (due 11.33). Take lunch.

To obtain cheap return tickets, 6s. 6d., meet Mr. Leighton on Main Line Platform not later than 9.30.

Walk northward by cliff-path to Warden, where there is gravel over the London Clay. Note the loss of land here.

If the tide allows, go down to the beach and continue the walk westward along the foot of the cliffs, looking for fossil wood, fruits, etc. (pyritised), for which Sheppey is noted, as well as other fossils. If the tide has not fallen low enough for this the walk must be along the top of the cliff, until a descent can be made.

Over two miles westward of Warden, Bagshot Sand comes in between the Gravel (which is in patches, not continuous) and the London Clay, and it continues to East End, Minster. The result of the sheet of permeable beds above the clay is the oozing out of water in the upper part of the cliff, and this probably helps in the cutting back of the land.

At East End tea will be taken, and then the return journey will be started by a walk southward to Brambledown Halt for the 7.46 train to Queenborough, where the train will be taken to Victoria, due 9.55.

Walking distance, about 6 or 7 miles.

Those wishing to join this Excursion are requested to send a Postcard to Mr. Leighton at least 3 days beforehand.

REFERENCES.

Ord. Maps 272, 273, new ser. Geol. Maps 2, 3.

Geol. Survey Memoir, vol. iv. ("Geology of the London Basin.")

1869. Excursion to Sheppey, Proc. Geol. Assoc., vol, xv, pt. 10, p. 459.

Images

List of photographs

Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910]

Page 69 P805468 Leysdown, showing position of the shell beach which has been banked up over the alluvium of the small marsh between the headlands. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 69 P805469 Leysdown. The shell beach from tide level. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 69 P805470 Leysdown. The shell beach from inland. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 69 P805471 Leysdown. The material of which the shell beach is formed. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 71 P805472 Marsh clay with plant remains cropping out from beneath the shell beach. These miniature cliffs and outliers are formed by the sea cutting back across the alluvium of the stream valley. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 71 P805473 Marsh clay with plant remains cropping out from beneath the shell beach. These miniature cliffs and outliers are formed by the sea cutting back across the alluvium of the stream valley. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 71 P805474 Cliff known as Sheppey Landsend. This headland of London Clay is the most easterly point of the cliffs. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 71 P805475 Owing to the waste of the clay by atmospheric agencies the base of the cliff is strewn with the septaria which fall down as the softer material is washed away. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 73 P805476 At this part of the cliff the loss of land is well seen where masses of land slide down from the cliff edge with the outer edge tilted up. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 73 P805477 During heavy rains large quantities of the soft material forming the cliff flow down the undercliff in the form of mud streams. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 73 P805478 The top beds of the London Clay are sandy, passing gradually into the Bagshot Sands. The total thickness of the Clay here being about 500 feet as shown by boring. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910].
Page 73 P805479 Near the coast this gully is seen to be a deep canyon-like gorge tailing off inland to a shallower hollow with sloping sides. Excursion to Sheppey [7th May 1910]. This is a good example of stream erosion, the little stream being sometimes torrential in the lowest part of the gorge. As the coast is cut backward so the end of the little valley is cut down to base level.