Difference between revisions of "Excursion to Tunbridge Wells. Saturday, May 13th, 1916 - Geologists' Association excursion"

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== Tunbridge Wells. Saturday, May 13th, 1916 (Transcription from : GA Circular No. 187. Session 1915-1916 p.2-3)==
 
== Tunbridge Wells. Saturday, May 13th, 1916 (Transcription from : GA Circular No. 187. Session 1915-1916 p.2-3)==
  
'''DIRECTOR''': DR. G. ABBOTT, FaG,S,.
+
'''DIRECTOR''': DR. G. ABBOTT, F.G.S.
  
 
'''EXCURSION SECRETARY''': Miss E. PEARSE, Bessborough Mansions, Westminster, S. W.
 
'''EXCURSION SECRETARY''': Miss E. PEARSE, Bessborough Mansions, Westminster, S. W.
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Outward train: Charing Cross, 1.5 p.m.; due at Tunbridge Wells, 2.13 p.m,
 
Outward train: Charing Cross, 1.5 p.m.; due at Tunbridge Wells, 2.13 p.m,
  
Return train Tunbridge Wells (S..E. & C.N..), 6.59 ; due at Charing Cross, 8.27.
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Return train Tunbridge Wells (S..E. & C.N.), 6.59 ; due at Charing Cross, 8.27.
  
 
Fare: Return Ticket to Tunbridge Wells, 5s. 5d.
 
Fare: Return Ticket to Tunbridge Wells, 5s. 5d.
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1909. ABBOTT, G.—"Excursion to Eridge and Tunbridge Wells" ''Proc.Geol. Assoc.'',vol. xxi p. 207.
 
1909. ABBOTT, G.—"Excursion to Eridge and Tunbridge Wells" ''Proc.Geol. Assoc.'',vol. xxi p. 207.
 +
 
== Images ==
 
== Images ==
 
===Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916 ===
 
===Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916 ===

Latest revision as of 12:42, 13 October 2020

P804798.jpg

Geologists' Association Circular No. 187. Session 1915-1916 p.2-3[edit]

Tunbridge Wells. Saturday, May 13th, 1916 (Transcription from : GA Circular No. 187. Session 1915-1916 p.2-3)[edit]

DIRECTOR: DR. G. ABBOTT, F.G.S.

EXCURSION SECRETARY: Miss E. PEARSE, Bessborough Mansions, Westminster, S. W.

Outward train: Charing Cross, 1.5 p.m.; due at Tunbridge Wells, 2.13 p.m,

Return train Tunbridge Wells (S..E. & C.N.), 6.59 ; due at Charing Cross, 8.27.

Fare: Return Ticket to Tunbridge Wells, 5s. 5d.

Distance to b walked, 4 miles.

Dr. Abbott has kindly invited the members at the party to tea; all who propose joining the excursion are requested to send in their names to Miss Pearse riot laterthan May 10th.

This exclusion has been arranged chiefly to enable members to inspect.Dr. Abbott's fine collection of Concretions from the magnesium limestone of Fulwell and the numerous concretionary forms assumed by other minerals, This collection has been formed to serve as a basis for an explanation of the growth and structure of concretions. After Dr. Abbott's collection has been examined the party will Walk to the High Rocks, under the guidance of Mr. H. E. Turner, B.Sc., to inspect the peculiar weathering and other features here shown by the Hastings Sands.Walk thence to the S.E. & C.R. Station.

REFERENCES.

Geological Survey Map. Sheet 6.

1907. ABBOTT, G.—"Concretions." South Eastern Naturalist, a suggested classification, with numerous beautiful illustrations.

1909. ABBOTT, G.—"Excursion to Eridge and Tunbridge Wells" Proc.Geol. Assoc.,vol. xxi p. 207.

Images[edit]

Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916[edit]

List of photographs[edit]

Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916[edit]

Page 81 P804782 Tunbridge Wells Sands of the Hastings Sands ? Wealden. Waterloo Rocks, Tunbridge Wells Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 81 P804783 Tunbridge Wells Sands of the Hastings Sands ? Wealden. Waterloo Rocks, Tunbridge Wells Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 81 P804784 This row of little openings is caused by water percolating through the sandstone which in winter forms a row of icicles which in melting carries away the sand. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. Added note: an arrow to indicate the openings.
Page 81 P804785 Joints in sandstone enlarged by denudation. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 83 P804786 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. These Wealden rocks which are such an important feature in this part of Kent are the upper beds of the Hastings Sands. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. They have the appearance of being very hard and massive but generally it is the outside only which is hard, so that if this shell is removed the inside can be easily broken down by the fingers. They appear to have been preserved by the regular size of the sand grains of which it is built up and to their planes of division being regular and few joints to allow the wind and rain to penetrate.
Page 83 P804787 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. These Wealden rocks which are such an important feature in this part of Kent are the upper beds of the Hastings Sands. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. They have the appearance of being very hard and massive but generally it is the outside only which is hard, so that if this shell is removed the inside can be easily broken down by the fingers. They appear to have been preserved by the regular size of the sand grains of which it is built up and to their planes of division being regular and few joints to allow the wind and rain to penetrate.
Page 83 P804788 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. These Wealden rocks which are such an important feature in this part of Kent are the upper beds of the Hastings Sands. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. They have the appearance of being very hard and massive but generally it is the outside only which is hard, so that if this shell is removed the inside can be easily broken down by the fingers. They appear to have been preserved by the regular size of the sand grains of which it is built up and to their planes of division being regular and few joints to allow the wind and rain to penetrate.
Page 83 P804789 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. These Wealden rocks which are such an important feature in this part of Kent are the upper beds of the Hastings Sands. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. They have the appearance of being very hard and massive but generally it is the outside only which is hard, so that if this shell is removed the inside can be easily broken down by the fingers. They appear to have been preserved by the regular size of the sand grains of which it is built up and to their planes of division being regular and few joints to allow the wind and rain to penetrate.
Page 85 P804790 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. These joints or vertical fissures were originally caused by the sandstone shrinking on drying, and afterwards made larger by the effects of the weather. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 85 P804791 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. These joints or vertical fissures were originally caused by the sandstone shrinking on drying, and afterwards made larger by the effects of the weather. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 85 P804792 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. Undercutting of many of these surfaces is owing to the lower part being softer and more rapidly removed by dust erosion, and the repeated peeling in summer time of a layer of moss or liverwort.
Page 85 P804793 High Rocks, Tunbridge Wells. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. Undercutting of many of these surfaces is owing to the lower part being softer and more rapidly removed by dust erosion, and the repeated peeling in summer time of a layer of moss or liverwort.
Page 87 P804794 High Rocks Lane. Characteristic patches of honeycomb weathering are well seen here. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. It shows that the oxide of iron that cements the sand grains together and gives the rock the powers of resistance to weather is very unequally distributed, much having been abstracted by the percolation of water and other agencies more obscure. The pattern is considered to have originated by the breaking up of a damp surface into circular damp spots, thus driving the cementing material to the outside of the circle when the dry sandy interior is removed by the wind.
Page 87 P804795 High Rocks Lane. Characteristic patches of honeycomb weathering are well seen here. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. It shows that the oxide of iron that cements the sand grains together and gives the rock the powers of resistance to weather is very unequally distributed, much having been abstracted by the percolation of water and other agencies more obscure. The pattern is considered to have originated by the breaking up of a damp surface into circular damp spots, thus driving the cementing material to the outside of the circle when the dry sandy interior is removed by the wind.
Page 87 P804796 High Rocks Lane. Characteristic patches of honeycomb weathering are well seen here. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. It shows that the oxide of iron that cements the sand grains together and gives the rock the powers of resistance to weather is very unequally distributed, much having been abstracted by the percolation of water and other agencies more obscure. The pattern is considered to have originated by the breaking up of a damp surface into circular damp spots, thus driving the cementing material to the outside of the circle when the dry sandy interior is removed by the wind.
Page 87 P804797 High Rocks Lane. Characteristic patches of honeycomb weathering are well seen here. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. It shows that the oxide of iron that cements the sand grains together and gives the rock the powers of resistance to weather is very unequally distributed, much having been abstracted by the percolation of water and other agencies more obscure. The pattern is considered to have originated by the breaking up of a damp surface into circular damp spots, thus driving the cementing material to the outside of the circle when the dry sandy interior is removed by the wind.
Page 89 P804798 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. The Toad Rock is a ?land stack? the general form of which has been determined by the intersection of joints, its isolated position being due to circum-denudation while the usual undercutting has contributed towards the striking resemblance to a toad.
Page 89 P804799 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. The Toad Rock is a ?land stack? the general form of which has been determined by the intersection of joints, its isolated position being due to circum-denudation while the usual undercutting has contributed towards the striking resemblance to a toad.
Page 89 P804800 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. The Toad Rock is a ?land stack? the general form of which has been determined by the intersection of joints, its isolated position being due to circum-denudation while the usual undercutting has contributed towards the striking resemblance to a toad.
Page 89 P804801 Rusthall Common. Back of Toad Rock. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. The Toad Rock is a ?land stack? the general form of which has been determined by the intersection of joints, its isolated position being due to circum-denudation while the usual undercutting has contributed towards the striking resemblance to a toad.
Page 91 P804802 Rusthall Common. Joints in Tunbridge Wells Sands. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 91 P804803 Rusthall Common. The master joint called ?Foxes Hole? which crosses the common and forms the back of the Toad Rock. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 91 P804804 Rusthall Common. The ?Parson's Head?. This shows how the drips are wearing away the lower stone. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916.
Page 93 P804805 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. These sands were originally rich in iron oxide which is constantly being removed by the percolation of water and other agencies, both chemical and organic, so that they are becoming now completely decolourised, the ground being a very fine white sand.
Page 93 P804806 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. These sands were originally rich in iron oxide which is constantly being removed by the percolation of water and other agencies, both chemical and organic, so that they are becoming now completely decolourised, the ground being a very fine white sand.
Page 93 P804807 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. These sands were originally rich in iron oxide which is constantly being removed by the percolation of water and other agencies, both chemical and organic, so that they are becoming now completely decolourised, the ground being a very fine white sand.
Page 93 P804808 Rusthall Common. Excursion to Tunbridge Wells, May 13th 1916. These sands were originally rich in iron oxide which is constantly being removed by the percolation of water and other agencies, both chemical and organic, so that they are becoming now completely decolourised, the ground being a very fine white sand.