Editing Geological history of Yorkshire

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The solid geology of Yorkshire is dominated by rocks of the Carboniferous to Cretaceous systems ([[:File:YGS_YORKROCK_FIG_01_00.jpg|Figure 1]]). The hills and dales of the Pennines in the west, together with the industrial cities of the centre and south, are underlain by Carboniferous rocks. These continue at depth where a narrow belt of Permian scarps and broader Triassic vales stretch south from Teeside and bisect the county. To the east, the deeply dissected tableland of the North York Moors is formed of Jurassic rocks and the rolling wolds to the south lie on the Cretaceous. The effects of the last glaciation are widely apparent in the moulding of landforms, and a veneer of glacial and periglacial sediments obscures much of the solid geology, particularly in the lowlands. Much older rocks, forming the foundation of the county at depth, are exposed at the surface only locally in the far west, where they extend the geological record back to the early Ordovician ([[:File:YGS_YORKROCK_FIG_02_00.jpg|Figure 2]]). The rocks of the county contain a wide range of economic resources, from lead and zinc to iron and coal, which have been exploited from at least Roman times to the present day. The scars of their extraction are widespread in the countryside and their importance to Yorkshire's historical development is evident in the industrial base of the major centres of population.
 
The solid geology of Yorkshire is dominated by rocks of the Carboniferous to Cretaceous systems ([[:File:YGS_YORKROCK_FIG_01_00.jpg|Figure 1]]). The hills and dales of the Pennines in the west, together with the industrial cities of the centre and south, are underlain by Carboniferous rocks. These continue at depth where a narrow belt of Permian scarps and broader Triassic vales stretch south from Teeside and bisect the county. To the east, the deeply dissected tableland of the North York Moors is formed of Jurassic rocks and the rolling wolds to the south lie on the Cretaceous. The effects of the last glaciation are widely apparent in the moulding of landforms, and a veneer of glacial and periglacial sediments obscures much of the solid geology, particularly in the lowlands. Much older rocks, forming the foundation of the county at depth, are exposed at the surface only locally in the far west, where they extend the geological record back to the early Ordovician ([[:File:YGS_YORKROCK_FIG_02_00.jpg|Figure 2]]). The rocks of the county contain a wide range of economic resources, from lead and zinc to iron and coal, which have been exploited from at least Roman times to the present day. The scars of their extraction are widespread in the countryside and their importance to Yorkshire's historical development is evident in the industrial base of the major centres of population.
  
At the beginning of this geological history, the area of the British Isles existed as the pieces of a giant jigsaw moving slowly towards their final assembly. In the early–mid Ordovician, the area that is now Yorkshire occupied the northern margin of the micro-continent of Eastern Avalonia, which lay in high southern latitudes ([[:File:YGS_YORKROCK_FIG_03_00.jpg|Figure 3]]a). During the Ordovician and early Silurian, Eastern Avalonia drifted northwards towards the mid-latitude continent of Baltica, consisting of the landmass from Scandinavia to the Urals, and the large equatorial continent of Laurentia, comprising present-day North America, Greenland, Scotland and northeast Ireland, as the intervening Iapetus Ocean and Tornquist's Sea gradually narrowed by the '''subduction''' of ocean crust.
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At the beginning of this geological history, the area of the British Isles existed as the pieces of a giant jigsaw moving slowly towards their final assembly. In the early–mid Ordovician, the area that is now Yorkshire occupied the northern margin of the micro-continent of Eastern Avalonia, which lay in high southern latitudes ([[:File:YGS_YORKROCK_FIG_03_00.jpg|Figure 3]]a). During the Ordovician and early Silurian, Eastern Avalonia drifted northwards towards the mid-latitude continent of Baltica, consisting of the landmass from Scandinavia to the Urals, and the large equatorial continent of Laurentia, comprising present-day North America, Greenland, Scotland and northeast Ireland, as the intervening Iapetus Ocean and Tornquist's Sea gradually narrowed by the subduction of ocean crust.
  
 
== Ordovician to Silurian ==
 
== Ordovician to Silurian ==

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