Editing Geology and landscape of Holy Island and Bamburgh - an excursion

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On the foreshore some 75 m east of the path, a near horizontal surface or bench, c.1.5 m wide and just above beach level, occurs in the southern wall of the dyke ([[:File:YGS_NORTROCK_FIG_06_2.jpg|Figure 6.2]]b). There are patchy skins of sediments on both the dyke wall, visible to a height of 6 m, and the bench, which extends eastwards for 75 m.
 
On the foreshore some 75 m east of the path, a near horizontal surface or bench, c.1.5 m wide and just above beach level, occurs in the southern wall of the dyke ([[:File:YGS_NORTROCK_FIG_06_2.jpg|Figure 6.2]]b). There are patchy skins of sediments on both the dyke wall, visible to a height of 6 m, and the bench, which extends eastwards for 75 m.
  
==== Locality 4, Steel End [NU 130 416] ====
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==== Locality 4, Steel End [NU 130 416] ====
  
At the eastern end of the Heugh Hill dyke segment, a smooth chilled surface dipping east, exposed at low tide, represents the original upper surface of the dyke. Abundant elongate amygdales and many 'ropy flow' structures, all with a southwest trend, can be seen where not seaweed covered. To the west are a series of northwest–southeast trending shatter zones.
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At the eastern end of the Heugh Hill dyke segment, a smooth chilled surface dipping 5 east, exposed at low tide, represents the original upper surface of the dyke. Abundant elongate amygdales and many 'ropy flow' structures, all with a southwest trend, can be seen where not seaweed covered. To the west are a series of northwest–southeast trending shatter zones.
  
 
The Ouse embayment, viewed from the jetty at Steel End, originated by the erosion of softer Carboniferous sediments, and is protected to the west and east by sections of the Holy Island Dyke (The Heugh and Riding Stone). Walking east around The Ouse note the depression between the shingle ridge on the west side of the bay and the priory ruins, the residue of a seaward extension of the channel from The Lough.
 
The Ouse embayment, viewed from the jetty at Steel End, originated by the erosion of softer Carboniferous sediments, and is protected to the west and east by sections of the Holy Island Dyke (The Heugh and Riding Stone). Walking east around The Ouse note the depression between the shingle ridge on the west side of the bay and the priory ruins, the residue of a seaward extension of the channel from The Lough.
  
==== Locality 5, Cockle Stone [NU 134 417] ====
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==== Locality 5, Cockle Stone [NU 134 417] ====
  
Near the wooden remains of the lime jetty at high water mark on the eastern side of The Ouse are exposures of the Sandbanks Limestone with small brachiopods (productids, spiriferids and ''Chonetes), ''intruded by the Riding Stone-Cockle Stone segment of the dyke echelon. At the south side of the eastern end of the segment a 4 m wide flat bench of chilled rock (Figure 6.3) exhibits 'ropy flow' structures which trend east-northeast.
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Near the wooden remains of the lime jetty at high water mark on the eastern side of The Ouse are exposures of the Sandbanks Limestone with small brachiopods (productids, spiriferids and ''Chonetes), ''intruded by the Riding Stone-Cockle Stone segment of the dyke echelon. At the south side of the eastern end of the segment a 4 m wide flat bench of chilled rock (Figure 6.3) exhibits 'ropy flow' structures which trend east-northeast.
  
==== Locality 6, Castle or Beblowe Hill [NU 136 418] ====
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==== Locality 6, Castle or Beblowe Hill [NU 136 418] ====
  
 
From this high vantage point on the southeast side of the island, the southward-staggered emplacement of segments of the Holy Island Dyke echelon (Plough Rock, Castle Hill, Riding Stone, the Heugh and St Cuthbert's Isle) is clear, and is reflected in the off-set nature of the coastline to the west. The boggy hollow to the north of the castle with the large pool ('The Stank') is all that remains of a marine gulf that once separated the Castle Hill island from the rest of Holy Island. This gulf is now partly filled with marine sediments.
 
From this high vantage point on the southeast side of the island, the southward-staggered emplacement of segments of the Holy Island Dyke echelon (Plough Rock, Castle Hill, Riding Stone, the Heugh and St Cuthbert's Isle) is clear, and is reflected in the off-set nature of the coastline to the west. The boggy hollow to the north of the castle with the large pool ('The Stank') is all that remains of a marine gulf that once separated the Castle Hill island from the rest of Holy Island. This gulf is now partly filled with marine sediments.
  
Here the dyke segment is almost 60 m wide. At the western end, skins of sediments cling to the south wall of the dyke which dips 60° south. Below the castle a small 'white Whin' off-shoot from the main dyke extends some 11.5 m into shale. Joints parallel to the dyke wall are obvious along the length of the dyke, but near the lime kilns these joints flatten giving the false impression that the dyke is converting into a sill.
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Here the dyke segment is almost 60 m wide. At the western end, skins of sediments cling to the south wall of the dyke which dips 60° south. Below the castle a small 'white Whin' off-shoot from the main dyke extends some 11.5 m into shale. Joints parallel to the dyke wall are obvious along the length of the dyke, but near the lime kilns these joints flatten giving the false impression that the dyke is converting into a sill.
  
 
==== Locality 7, Castle Point Lime Kilns [NU 138 417] ====
 
==== Locality 7, Castle Point Lime Kilns [NU 138 417] ====

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