Editing History of the British Geological Survey

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In August 1835, De la Beche obtained funding from the Board of Works to establish a museum at Craig's Court, Whitehall, London. The Museum of Economic Geology was furnished with a chemical laboratory which opened for commercial work in June 1839, while the museum itself was accessible to personal callers from August of that year, although its formal date of opening is usually stated to be 1841.
 
In August 1835, De la Beche obtained funding from the Board of Works to establish a museum at Craig's Court, Whitehall, London. The Museum of Economic Geology was furnished with a chemical laboratory which opened for commercial work in June 1839, while the museum itself was accessible to personal callers from August of that year, although its formal date of opening is usually stated to be 1841.
 
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'''1840 — Mining Record Office'''
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1840 — Mining Record Office'''
  
 
In April 1839 approval was given by Treasury for the Museum of Economic Geology to take custody of a proposed collection of mining records; this led to the establishment of a Mining Record Office following the appointment of a Keeper of Mining Records in October 1840. Statistical information on mineral production and trade was collected for selected minerals from 1845 but was expanded thereafter as an annual publication covering a wider range of minerals produced and traded in the UK from 1853. Responsibility for mineral statistics passed to the Home Office in 1881 and returned to BGS in the 1960s.
 
In April 1839 approval was given by Treasury for the Museum of Economic Geology to take custody of a proposed collection of mining records; this led to the establishment of a Mining Record Office following the appointment of a Keeper of Mining Records in October 1840. Statistical information on mineral production and trade was collected for selected minerals from 1845 but was expanded thereafter as an annual publication covering a wider range of minerals produced and traded in the UK from 1853. Responsibility for mineral statistics passed to the Home Office in 1881 and returned to BGS in the 1960s.
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The Geological Survey Act of 1845 provided the Survey with a legal framework designed 'to facilitate the completion of a geological survey of Great Britain and Ireland.' Responsibility for the Survey, which now incorporated a geological department in Ireland, passed from the Board of Ordnance to the Office of Woods, Forests, Land Revenues, Works and Buildings. This transition meant that field officers of the Survey were no longer required to wear the military-style uniform of blue serge with brass buttons and a top hat!
 
The Geological Survey Act of 1845 provided the Survey with a legal framework designed 'to facilitate the completion of a geological survey of Great Britain and Ireland.' Responsibility for the Survey, which now incorporated a geological department in Ireland, passed from the Board of Ordnance to the Office of Woods, Forests, Land Revenues, Works and Buildings. This transition meant that field officers of the Survey were no longer required to wear the military-style uniform of blue serge with brass buttons and a top hat!
 
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1851 — A new Museum of Practical Geology
'''1851 — A new Museum of Practical Geology'''
 
 
 
 
Having outgrown the limited accommodation at Craig’s Court, arrangements were put in hand in 1845 for erecting a new museum and offices for the Geological Survey. On 12 May 1851, the year of the Great Exhibition, the new Geological Survey and Museum of Practical Geology was formally opened by Prince Albert in Jermyn Street, a prime London location. The Survey offices and library were situated in the rear of the building, which fronted onto Piccadilly. Also included was a lecture theatre, laboratories and the Mining Record Office.
 
Having outgrown the limited accommodation at Craig’s Court, arrangements were put in hand in 1845 for erecting a new museum and offices for the Geological Survey. On 12 May 1851, the year of the Great Exhibition, the new Geological Survey and Museum of Practical Geology was formally opened by Prince Albert in Jermyn Street, a prime London location. The Survey offices and library were situated in the rear of the building, which fronted onto Piccadilly. Also included was a lecture theatre, laboratories and the Mining Record Office.
  

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