Editing Lithostratigraphy of the Grampian Caledonides

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Accounts of the stratigraphical successions are now published for the South-west Highlands, the Southern Highlands and parts of the Central Highlands. Most of the North-east Highlands and substantial parts of the Monadhliath Mountains of the Central Highlands have only recently been, or are still being, mapped. Much of the following account for these areas is based upon this, as yet unpublished, mapping.
 
Accounts of the stratigraphical successions are now published for the South-west Highlands, the Southern Highlands and parts of the Central Highlands. Most of the North-east Highlands and substantial parts of the Monadhliath Mountains of the Central Highlands have only recently been, or are still being, mapped. Much of the following account for these areas is based upon this, as yet unpublished, mapping.
  
Correlation between local successions is complicated by lateral facies changes, diachronous boundaries, local unconformities, non-sequences, tectonic discontinuities and changes in metamorphic grade. However, certain key units of distinctive lithology have been traced throughout the Grampian Highlands and, in some cases, through north-western Ireland, for distances of up to 700 km. Such key units may have different names in different areas. Intervening beds are generally less traceable but they may make up distinctive lithostratigraphical sequences traceable over various distances. [[Media:P915418.png|P915418]] presents a correlation table for the Dalradian Supergroup which reflects the general consensus among current workers. This builds on the original subdivision of the Dalradian by Harris and Pitcher (1975). The Dalradian Supergroup has a total aggregate thickness of more than 25 km. Such a considerable thickness is not developed in any one continuous section or in any one area because deposition occurred in basins of different and changing morphology. The sedimentary succession at various places has been modified by tectonic thickening and thinning during the orogenic deformation which followed the original deposition (Borradaile and Johnson, 1973).
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Correlation between local successions is complicated by lateral facies changes, diachronous boundaries, local unconformities, non-sequences, tectonic discontinuities and changes in metamorphic grade. However, certain key units of distinctive lithology have been traced throughout the Grampian Highlands and, in some cases, through north-western Ireland, for distances of up to 700 km. Such key units may have different names in different areas. Intervening beds are generally less traceable but they may make up distinctive lithostratigraphical sequences traceable over various distances. P915418 presents a correlation table for the Dalradian Supergroup which reflects the general consensus among current workers. This builds on the original subdivision of the Dalradian by Harris and Pitcher (1975). The Dalradian Supergroup has a total aggregate thickness of more than 25 km. Such a considerable thickness is not developed in any one continuous section or in any one area because deposition occurred in basins of different and changing morphology. The sedimentary succession at various places has been modified by tectonic thickening and thinning during the orogenic deformation which followed the original deposition (Borradaile and Johnson, 1973).
 
==[[References, Grampian Highlands|Full list of references]]==
 
==[[References, Grampian Highlands|Full list of references]]==
 
[[Category:Grampian Highlands]]
 
[[Category:Grampian Highlands]]

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