Editing Millstone Grit of Almscliff Crag and Harlow Car, near Harrogate - an excursion

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==== Locality 1 [SE 265 491] - at the roadside ====
 
==== Locality 1 [SE 265 491] - at the roadside ====
  
Seen from here, the Crag is clearly made up of two cliffs, each about 15 m high, separated by a flattish slack. Big blocks have fallen off the cliffs. Walk up the footpath to the lower crag.
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Seen from here, the Crag is clearly made up of two cliffs, each about 15 m high, separated by a flattish slack. Big blocks have fallen off the cliffs. Walk up the footpath to the lower crag.
  
 
==== Locality 2 - the lower crag ====
 
==== Locality 2 - the lower crag ====
  
Climb up and proceed anticlockwise round the top of it. The Almscliff Grit is a coarse to very coarse-grained sandstone with scattered pebbles of '''quartz'''. The major bedding planes '''dip''' northeast at about 22°. Approximately 1 m wide trough '''cross-bedding''' sets clearly indicate sand transport by currents flowing from the northeast. The cross-bedding can be seen below overhangs and on the top (dip slope) surface of the lower crag.
+
Climb up and proceed anticlockwise round the top of it. The Almscliff Grit is a coarse to very coarse-grained sandstone with scattered pebbles of quartz. The major bedding planes dip northeast at about 22°. Approximately 1 m wide trough cross-bedding sets clearly indicate sand transport by currents flowing from the northeast. The cross-bedding can be seen below overhangs and on the top (dip slope) surface of the lower crag.
  
 
==== Locality 3 - across the flattish slack area at the foot of the upper crag ====
 
==== Locality 3 - across the flattish slack area at the foot of the upper crag ====
  
The bedding on this face looks flat, but continue anticlockwise round the base of the cliff until the relationship between cross-bedding and '''tectonic''' dip again becomes clear. Both are much the same as in the lower crag. Good cross-bedding troughs, again pointing southwest, can be seen on the dip slope of this crag also.
+
The bedding on this face looks flat, but continue anticlockwise round the base of the cliff until the relationship between cross-bedding and tectonic dip again becomes clear. Both are much the same as in the lower crag. Good cross-bedding troughs, again pointing southwest, can be seen on the dip slope of this crag also.
  
 
Climb to the top of the crag and look at the view. To the south, a prominent escarpment forms the south side of Wharfedale, from Rombalds Moor behind Ilkley, in the west, through Otley Chevin and Arthington Bank to beyond Harewood, in the east. The escarpment is made up of a series of interbedded sandstones and mudstones in the upper half of the Millstone Grit sequence. They are dipping south beneath the Yorkshire coalfield, most of which is out of sight behind the escarpment. However the television mast at Emley Moor, visible in the distance through a low place in the escarpment above Arthington Viaduct, stands on a sandstone in the Lower Coal Measures. In the far distance, behind the Emley mast and to the right of it, the Millstone Grit appears again, forming the skyline. This is the central Pennine moorland between Huddersfield and Manchester.
 
Climb to the top of the crag and look at the view. To the south, a prominent escarpment forms the south side of Wharfedale, from Rombalds Moor behind Ilkley, in the west, through Otley Chevin and Arthington Bank to beyond Harewood, in the east. The escarpment is made up of a series of interbedded sandstones and mudstones in the upper half of the Millstone Grit sequence. They are dipping south beneath the Yorkshire coalfield, most of which is out of sight behind the escarpment. However the television mast at Emley Moor, visible in the distance through a low place in the escarpment above Arthington Viaduct, stands on a sandstone in the Lower Coal Measures. In the far distance, behind the Emley mast and to the right of it, the Millstone Grit appears again, forming the skyline. This is the central Pennine moorland between Huddersfield and Manchester.

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