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The Piltdown story provides a cautionary lesson on how scientists can get things wrong and how science, when applied correctly, can reveal error and malpractice.
 
The Piltdown story provides a cautionary lesson on how scientists can get things wrong and how science, when applied correctly, can reveal error and malpractice.
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== Further reading and detailed bibliography ==
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If you want to find out more about Piltdown then the following books would be a good place to start:
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Russell, Miles, ''The Piltdown Man forgery: Case Closed ''(The History Press, 2012)
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Spencer, Frank, ''The Piltdown Papers ''(Oxford University Press, 1990)
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Walsh, John, ''Unravelling Piltdown: The Science Fraud of the Century and Its Solution ''(Random House, 1996)
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Weiner, J S, ''The Piltdown Forgery ''(Fiftieth Anniversary edition, with a new Introduction and Afterword by Chris Stringer, Oxford University Press, 2003)
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For a more detailed study of the whole Piltdown story, BGS Historian David G Bate has compiled a large [http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/507543/ annotated bibliography].
  
 
== Timeline ==
 
== Timeline ==
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| style="vertical-align:top;" | [[File:Piltdown 037.jpg|150px|Discussion on the Piltdown skull, a painting by John Cooke, 1915. Back row, left to right: Frank Barlow, Prof. Grafton Elliot Smith, Charles Dawson, and Dr Arthur Smith Woodward; front row: Dr A. S. Underwood, Prof. Arthur Keith, William Pycraft, and Sir Ray Lankester. © The Geological Society (GSL/POR/19)]]
 
| style="vertical-align:top;" | [[File:Piltdown 037.jpg|150px|Discussion on the Piltdown skull, a painting by John Cooke, 1915. Back row, left to right: Frank Barlow, Prof. Grafton Elliot Smith, Charles Dawson, and Dr Arthur Smith Woodward; front row: Dr A. S. Underwood, Prof. Arthur Keith, William Pycraft, and Sir Ray Lankester. © The Geological Society (GSL/POR/19)]]
 
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== Suspects ==
 
== Suspects ==
  
In the years that followed the uncovering of the forgery, a wearisome succession of names would be added to the list of the ‘accused’. In the order in which they were publicly identified, they are: Charles Dawson, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, W. R. Butterfield, Venus Hargreaves, Grafton Elliot Smith, William J. Sollas, Martin Hinton, Arthur Conan Doyle, Samuel Woodhead, John T. Hewitt, Lewis Abbott, Frank Barlow, Arthur Keith, Chipper the goose (in jest!), Arthur Smith Woodward, and C. P. Chatwin. A few minor names, alluded to but never fully discussed, have been omitted from this list (but see the introduction in the annotated bibliography referenced under "Further reading and detailed bibliography").
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In the years that followed the uncovering of the forgery, a wearisome succession of names would be added to the list of the ‘accused’. In the order in which they were publicly identified, they are: Charles Dawson, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, W. R. Butterfield, Venus Hargreaves, Grafton Elliot Smith, William J. Sollas, Martin Hinton, Arthur Conan Doyle, Samuel Woodhead, John T. Hewitt, Lewis Abbott, Frank Barlow, Arthur Keith, Chipper the goose (in jest!), Arthur Smith Woodward, and C. P. Chatwin.
  
 
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On Mike Oldfield’s ‘Tubular Bells’ (1973) he is listed as playing ‘Piltdown Man’ which refers to some unintelligible vocalisation he does on the album.
 
On Mike Oldfield’s ‘Tubular Bells’ (1973) he is listed as playing ‘Piltdown Man’ which refers to some unintelligible vocalisation he does on the album.
 
== Further reading and detailed bibliography ==
 
 
If you want to find out more about Piltdown then the following books would be a good place to start:
 
 
Russell, Miles, ''The Piltdown Man forgery: Case Closed ''(The History Press, 2012)
 
 
Spencer, Frank, ''The Piltdown Papers ''(Oxford University Press, 1990)
 
 
Walsh, John, ''Unravelling Piltdown: The Science Fraud of the Century and Its Solution ''(Random House, 1996)
 
 
Weiner, J S, ''The Piltdown Forgery ''(Fiftieth Anniversary edition, with a new Introduction and Afterword by Chris Stringer, Oxford University Press, 2003)
 
 
For a more detailed study of the whole Piltdown story, BGS Historian David G Bate has compiled a large [http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/507543/ annotated bibliography].
 
  
 
[[Category:British geoscientists]]
 
[[Category:British geoscientists]]

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