Editing Quaternary features of Scugdale, northwest Cleveland Hills - an excursion

Jump to navigation Jump to search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.

This page supports semantic in-text annotations (e.g. "[[Is specified as::World Heritage Site]]") to build structured and queryable content provided by Semantic MediaWiki. For a comprehensive description on how to use annotations or the #ask parser function, please have a look at the getting started, in-text annotation, or inline queries help pages.

Latest revision Your text
Line 43: Line 43:
 
=== Locality 3, Swainby Moraine and Glacial Spillways ===
 
=== Locality 3, Swainby Moraine and Glacial Spillways ===
  
Travel by car northwards through Scarth Nick and down the steep northern edge of the Cleveland Hills, taking the right fork for Swainby some 3 km distant. Ample parking is available near the village church on the corner of High Street and Church Lane.
+
Travel by car northwards through Scarth Nick and down the steep northern edge of the Cleveland Hills, taking the right fork for Swainby some 3 km distant. Ample parking is available near the village church on the corner of High Street and Church Lane.
  
The lower ground at the foot of the Cleveland Scarp shows typical hummocky topography attributed to the outwash and morainic debris resulting from the melting of the ice damming 'Lake Scugdale'. A borehole [NZ 47710100] near Shepherd Hill proved glacial deposits to a depth of at least 25 m. They comprised mostly yellow-brown clays with sand lenses in the upper 7 m, which overlie clayey sand and gravel in the lower section of the borehole. The sand becomes increasingly clayey towards the base. Another borehole at Huthwaite Green [NZ 4901 0081] on the opposite side of Scugdale proved yellow-brown stony till to a depth of at least 8 m.
+
The lower ground at the foot of the Cleveland Scarp shows typical hummocky topography attributed to the outwash and morainic debris resulting from the melting of the ice damming 'Lake Scugdale'. A borehole [NZ 47710100] near Shepherd Hill proved glacial deposits to a depth of at least 25 m. They comprised mostly yellow-brown clays with sand lenses in the upper 7 m, which overlie clayey sand and gravel in the lower section of the borehole. The sand becomes increasingly clayey towards the base. Another borehole at Huthwaite Green [NZ 4901 0081] on the opposite side of Scugdale proved yellow-brown stony till to a depth of at least 8 m.
  
Swainby is sited on a broad alluvial flat, in places up to 1 km wide, and out of all proportion to the size of the existing Crook Beck and Scugdale Beck which drain northwards through the village along the edge of High Street. The following glacial and post-glacial features were formed towards the end of the Devensian when the waning ice-sheet was largely confined to the lowland areas of the Teesside plain.
+
Swainby is sited on a broad alluvial flat, in places up to 1 km wide, and out of all proportion to the size of the existing Crook Beck and Scugdale Beck which drain northwards through the village along the edge of High Street. The following glacial and post-glacial features were formed towards the end of the Devensian when the waning ice-sheet was largely confined to the lowland areas of the Teesside plain.
  
The area is rich in glacial spillways. They comprise flat-bottomed channels, 10 to 30&nbsp;m wide, but with sharply defined edges of variable height. They may have been cut by sub-glacial streams or represent periods of still-stand in the ice as it retreated northwards. The water became restricted to these channels, confined by the emerging scarp of the Cleveland Hills to the south and the ice-front to the north. Boreholes in the bottom of the spillways show the top 4&nbsp;m or so to comprise recent alluvial deposits of soft grey mottled yellow clays and peat, overlying more than 14&nbsp;m of brown clays with weak inter-laminations of silt and fine sand. A 0.10&nbsp;m sample of peat [NZ 4525 0081] in the alluvium of Carr Beck, near Ingleby Arncliffe, was radiometrically '''dated''' at between 6450 ± 40 <sup>14</sup>C yrs BP. The locality is described as a 'gutter' on the inner edge of the Scugdale Moraine, attributed to glaciofluvial erosion, and its final silting-up is therefore datable to the Atlantic Period.
+
The area is rich in glacial spillways. They comprise flat-bottomed channels, to to 30 m wide, but with sharply defined edges of variable height. They may have been cut by sub-glacial streams or represent periods of still-stand in the ice as it retreated northwards. The water became restricted to these channels, confined by the emerging scarp of the Cleveland Hills to the south and the ice-front to the north. Boreholes in the bottom of the spillways show the top 4 m or so to comprise recent alluvial deposits of soft grey mottled yellow clays and peat, overlying more than 14 m of brown clays with weak inter-laminations of silt and fine sand. A 0.10 m sample of peat [NZ 4525 0081] in the alluvium of Carr Beck, near Ingleby Arncliffe, was radiometrically dated at between 6450 ± 40 <sup>14</sup>C yrs BP. The locality is described as a 'gutter' on the inner edge of the Scugdale Moraine, attributed to glaciofluvial erosion, and its final silting-up is therefore datable to the Atlantic Period.
  
 
Walk up Church Lane on the east side of Swainby High Street and climb Castle Bank to the remains of Whorlton Castle. The site utilized the steep bank of the Swainby glacial channel as its main defence to the north in medieval times. The bank is now subject to several small landslips in the drift and underlying shales of the basal beds of the early Jurassic Redcar Mudstone Formation. From this vantage point, the Swainby and Carr Beck spillway, which formed a major avenue for meltwater around the northwest corner of the Cleveland Hills, is clearly seen.
 
Walk up Church Lane on the east side of Swainby High Street and climb Castle Bank to the remains of Whorlton Castle. The site utilized the steep bank of the Swainby glacial channel as its main defence to the north in medieval times. The bank is now subject to several small landslips in the drift and underlying shales of the basal beds of the early Jurassic Redcar Mudstone Formation. From this vantage point, the Swainby and Carr Beck spillway, which formed a major avenue for meltwater around the northwest corner of the Cleveland Hills, is clearly seen.

Please note that all contributions to Earthwise may be edited, altered, or removed by other contributors. If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource (see Earthwise:Copyrights for details). Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)

  [] · [[]] · [[|]] · {{}} · · “” ‘’ «» ‹› „“ ‚‘ · ~ | ° &nbsp; · ± × ÷ ² ³ ½ · §
[[Category:]] · [[:File:]] · <code></code> · <syntaxhighlight></syntaxhighlight> · <includeonly></includeonly> · <noinclude></noinclude> · #REDIRECT[[]] · <translate></translate> · <languages/> · ==References== · {{reflist}} · ==Footnote== · {{reflist|group=note}} · <ref group=note> · __notoc__ · {{DEFAULTSORT:}} <div class="someclass noprint"></div> {{clear}} <br>