T W Reader geological photographs, long excursions 1914. Part 2 - index, GA 'Carreck Archive'

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T W Reader geological photographs, long excursions 1914. Part 1 - index, Geologists' Association 'Carreck Archive'

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GA002 P804235 Crystals of orthoclase with inclusions of biotite in St. Austell Granite, Gready Quarry. North Cornwall, April 16th 1914.
GA002 P804236 Crystals of orthoclase with inclusions of biotite in St. Austell Granite, Gready Quarry. North Cornwall, April 16th 1914.
GA002 P804237 Twinned crystal of orthoclase in St. Austell Granite, Gready Quarry. North Cornwall, April 16th 1914.
GA002 P804238 Luxulyanite. North Cornwall, April 16th 1914.
GA002 P804239 Carpalla Pit. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914. Added note: Killas.
GA002 P804240 Carpalla Pit. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804241 Carpalla Pit. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914. Specimens of Killas from the above section.
GA002 P804242 Carpalla Pit. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914. Specimens of Killas from the above section. Added note: Shewing tourmalined laminae (dark) alternating with arenaceous laminae (white) in which feldspar is Kaolinised.
GA002 P804243 Tregargus pit in China stone. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804244 China stone with band of tourmaline. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914. Added note: Tourmaline.
GA002 P804245 Coarsely crystallised lithium bearing Biotite in pegmatite. Trelavour Downs. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804246 Coarsely crystallised lithium bearing biotite in pegmatite. Trelavour Downs. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804247 Roche Rocks. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804248 Roche Rocks. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804249 Roche Rocks. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804250 Roche Rocks. North Cornwall, April 17th 1914.
GA002 P804251 Black Rocks - Cromford. Millstone Grit Escarpment. Excursion to Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. [People].
GA002 P804252 Black Rocks - Cromford. Millstone Grit Escarpment. Excursion to Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804253 In Derbyshire the Millstone Grit is made up of five thick beds of Sandstone each divided by a series of shales and sands interbedded. Excursion to Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. These 'Black Rocks' belong to the Fourth or Upper Kinder Scout Grit which here forms an escarpment. The rock standing out as bold craggy cliffs from the surrounding slopes and weathered into various shapes this having the fantastic title of the 'Field Gun'.
GA002 P804254 In Derbyshire the Millstone Grit is made up of five thick beds of Sandstone each divided by a series of shales and sands interbedded. Excursion to Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. These 'Black Rocks' belong to the Fourth or Upper Kinder Scout Grit which here forms an escarpment. The rock standing out as bold craggy cliffs from the surrounding slopes and weathered into various shapes this having the fantastic title of the 'Field Gun'.
GA002 P804255 Dolomitized Mountain Limestone - Hopton Wood Quarry by Middleton. This stone was largely used in building the Imperial Institute. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804256 Dolomitized Mountain Limestone - Hopton Wood Quarry by Middleton. This stone was largely used in building the Imperial Institute. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804257 Section in the Dolerite Sill at Ible. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804258 [Ible]. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. These igneous rocks of Derbyshire go by the name of Toadstones. Some say because the amydaloidal parts resemble the back of a toad while others trace it to the German word Todstein meaning dead stone because no ore is found in it.
GA002 P804259 This sill at Ible is one of nine intrusions of igneous material in this part of Derbyshire. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804260 [Ible]. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. In the centre of the intrusion the dolerite is coarse grained and ophitic but at the margins it is very finegrained. [People].
GA002 P804261 This sheet or sill of intrusive dolerite has a thickness of about 70 feet and is quarried for road metal. The Limestone below it has been baked into marble for a depth of several feet. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. [People].
GA002 P804262 This sheet or sill of intrusive dolerite has a thickness of about 70 feet and is quarried for road metal. The Limestone below it has been baked into marble for a depth of several feet. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804263 Joints in dolerite caused by shrinkage and disturbance. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804264 Vein of Chrysolite in Dolerite Sill. Ible. Wirksworth. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. These veins of chrysolite are found traversing the dolerite. The mineral is of a golden yellow colour and is built up of prisms or bundles of parallel fibres arranged perpendicularly to the walls of the cracks in which it has been deposited.
GA002 P804265 [Grange Mill]. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. Shothouse Spring. nodular and concretionary limestone resting on a bed of laminated tuff. To a height of about 10 ft above the spring the limestone is found to contain numerous small lapilli.
GA002 P804266 Grange Mill Vents. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. These consist of two dome shaped hills which rise from the valley to a height of 100 and 200 ft. This larger one covers an area of 2400 to 1300 ft. The smooth and steep grassy slopes consist of a grey rock with green lapilli and limestone pebbles.
GA002 P804267 Agglomerate at Grange Mill which was formerly a volcanic vent. This weathers into spheroids as seen above which were exposed in the southern vent. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804268 Agglomerate at Grange Mill which was formerly a volcanic vent. This weathers into spheroids as seen above which were exposed in the southern vent. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804269 Tufa Quarry, Via Gellia. This tufa consists of an amorphous carbonate of lime which has been deposited from a waterfall which previously existed at this place. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804270 Tufa Quarry, Via Gellia. This tufa consists of an amorphous carbonate of lime which has been deposited from a waterfall which previously existed at this place. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804271 [Via Gellia]. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. The present stream and waterfall as now existing by the side of the quarry shown above.
GA002 P804272 [Via Gellia]. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. The present stream and waterfall as now existing by the side of the quarry shown above.
GA002 P804273 Scrablag. A local name for peculiarly shaped concretions in sand. Ible. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804274 Scrablag. Ible Sill. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804275 Tufa. Via Gellia. Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. The Tufa is deposited around twigs, leaves, moss, shells, and bones of animals.
GA002 P804276 Tufa. With Helix. Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. The Tufa is deposited around twigs, leaves, moss, shells, and bones of animals.
GA002 P804277 Carboniferous Limestone, Via Gellia. The smooth surface on the right is considered by some to be slickensided. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914. [People].
GA002 P804278 Spheroidal dolerite, Via Gellia. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804279 Quarry in spheroidal dolerite near the Paint Works, Via Gellia. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804280 Quarry in spheroidal dolerite near the Paint Works, Via Gellia. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804281 Spheroidal dolerite in quarry near Pig of Lead, Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804282 Spheroidal dolerite in quarry near Pig of Lead, Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804283 Spheroidal dolerite in quarry near Pig of Lead, Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804284 Spheroidal dolerite in quarry near Pig of Lead, Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, July 28th 1914.
GA002 P804285 Ravenstor, Millers Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804286 Ravenstor, Millers Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Carboniferous Limestone resting on Lower Lava.
GA002 P804287 Ravenstor, Millers Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. In Tarnsley Dale. [Group photo].
GA002 P804288 Ravenstor, Millers Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Tideswell Dale.
GA002 P804289 Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. [Group photo, large version].
GA002 P804290 Derbyshire County Council Pit, Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. This dolerite which is worked for road metal is found in a sill which has a thickness of about 70 feet. It extends for nearly half a mile in a North to South direction. [People].
GA002 P804291 Derbyshire County Council Pit, Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. The dolerite varies in structure, in the centre it is coarsely crystalline while at the upper and lower surfaces it is fine grained. [People].
GA002 P804292 Derbyshire County Council Pit, Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Spheroidal weathering.
GA002 P804293 Derbyshire County Council Pit, Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Spheroidal weathering.
GA002 P804294 Columnar Volcanic Mud. Baked by Lava Flow. Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. At Tideswell Dale is a bed of red clay which was formerly a volcanic mud. This is found interbedded in the limestone. After its deposition a stream of lava flowed over it which hardened and baked it and caused it to assume a columnar structure.
GA002 P804295 Columnar Volcanic Mud. Baked by Lava Flow. Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. At Tideswell Dale is a bed of red clay which was formerly a volcanic mud. This is found interbedded in the limestone. After its deposition a stream of lava flowed over it which hardened and baked it and caused it to assume a columnar structure.
GA002 P804296 Carboniferous limestone, Monsal Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804297 Spheroides of Dolerite. Tideswell Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Owing to a chemical change in the dolerite due to weathering the blocks assume a spheroidal form.
GA002 P804298 Peep o' Day Quarry in the Carboniferous Limestone at Litton. This was originally a coral reef but is now consolidated into a hard massive limestone. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804299 Peep o' Day Quarry in the Carboniferous Limestone at Litton. This was originally a coral reef but is now consolidated into a hard massive limestone. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804300 [Peep o' Day Quary]. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Owing to the action of the weather on the exposed surfaces of the limestones the fine coral mud is gradually worn away leaving the corals standing out in relief in the positions in which they lived. Added note: coral.
GA002 P804301 [Peep o' Day Quary]. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Owing to the action of the weather on the exposed surfaces of the limestones the fine coral mud is gradually worn away leaving the corals standing out in relief in the positions in which they lived. Added note: coral.
GA002 P804302 Stepping stones across bed of what is a mountain torrent after rain. Cressbrook Dale. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804303 [Cressbrook Dale]. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804304 [Cressbrook Dale]. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Cressbrook Mill Stream! In dry weather this is a dry river bed in the Carboniferous limestone but after rain it becomes a mountain torrent. It shows the angular blocks being formed into pebbles.
GA002 P804305 [Cressbrook Dale]. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Cressbrook Mill Stream! In dry weather this is a dry river bed in the Carboniferous limestone but after rain it becomes a mountain torrent. It shows the angular blocks being formed into pebbles.
GA002 P804306 Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804307 Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804308 River Wye at Monsal Dale (Headstones). Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. The River Wye generally described as 'a singularly romantic river, running in deep rocky ravines, its clear stream sparkling along a confined and rugged bed' rises near Buxton on the northern slope of Axe Edge and joins the Derwent at Rowsley.
GA002 P804309 River Wye at Monsal Dale (Headstones). Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. The River Wye generally described as 'a singularly romantic river, running in deep rocky ravines, its clear stream sparkling along a confined and rugged bed' rises near Buxton on the northern slope of Axe Edge and joins the Derwent at Rowsley.
GA002 P804310 Boulder Clay overlying Carboniferous Limestone, Monsal Dale Station Quarry. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Some of the boulders consist of rock derived from the immediate locality while others have travelled from great distances, they are much scratched grooved and polished.
GA002 P804311 Boulder Clay overlying Carboniferous Limestone, Monsal Dale Station Quarry. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914. Some of the boulders consist of rock derived from the immediate locality while others have travelled from great distances, they are much scratched grooved and polished. [People].
GA002 P804312 Slickensided Carboniferous Limestone caused by one face of the rock sliding over the other owing to earth movements. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804313 Calc spar mine, Monsal Dale. This mine for obtaining calc spar is driven into a rake vein about 2 feet in width in the Carboniferous limestone. The vein is filled with calc spar with galena and barytes. Derbyshire, July 29th 1914.
GA002 P804314 Ridgeway Cutting, Ambergate. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Overthrust Fault in Coal seam, locally known as the 'Norton' seam.
GA002 P804315 Ridgeway Cutting, Ambergate. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Lower Coal Measures, Ridgeway Ry [Railway] Cutting.
GA002 P804316 Ridgeway Cutting, Ambergate. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Coal seam, 'Norton' Seam. [Person].
GA002 P804317 Ridgeway Cutting, Ambergate. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Lower Coal Measures in Ridgeway Cutting. Added note: 4=shales, 3=Gannister, 2=White Snady Fine Clay, 1=Sandstone.
GA002 P804318 Ridgeway Quarry in Millstone Grit. The Topmost Grit or 'Rough Rock'. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914.
GA002 P804319 Bullbridge Brickyard Pit in the Lower Coal Measures. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Added note: Shale resting on Marine Band above Alton Seam.
GA002 P804320 The Alton Coal seam Bullbridge Brickyard. This coal seam is about 300 feet above the base of the Coal Measures and is correlated with the Crabtree Coal of North Staffordshire and the Bullion Coal of Lancashire. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804321 The Alton Coal seam Bullbridge Brickyard. This coal seam is about 300 feet above the base of the Coal Measures and is correlated with the Crabtree Coal of North Staffordshire and the Bullion Coal of Lancashire. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804322 Crich. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. This inlier consists of a mass of Carboniferous Limestone about 1.5 miles in length. It forms an elongated dome running from N.N.W. to S.S.E.
GA002 P804323 Crich. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. This tower known as Crich Stand is built on the summit of a mass of Carboniferous Limestone known as the Crich inlier. It is 940 feet above sea level.
GA002 P804324 Crich. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Mammilated surface of Limestone. Cliff Quarry, Crich.
GA002 P804325 Crich. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. Cliff Quarry in the Crich inlier Carb. [Carboniferous] Limestone. This is D2. of Dr Vaughan. The limestone is traversed with viens containing Calcite, Fluorite, barytes, galena and Blendes. [People].
GA002 P804326 The Old Quarry in Carboniferous Limestone, Crich. The Limestone is capped by Glacial Drift containing local and foreign erratics. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914.
GA002 P804327 The Old Quarry in Carboniferous Limestone, Crich. The Limestone is capped by Glacial Drift containing local and foreign erratics. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914.
GA002 P804328 [Old Quarry, Crich]. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914. 'Pothole'. Solution-cavities in limestone filled with clay.
GA002 P804329 The Old Quarry, Crich. Solution cavities in Carb. [Carboniferous] Limestone filled with clay. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914.
GA002 P804330 Hilt's Quarry, Crich. Carboniferous Limestone. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914.
GA002 P804331 Hilt's Quarry, Crich. Carboniferous Limestone. Derbyshire, July 30th 1914.
GA002 P804332 Howden Dam. Derbyshire, July 31st 1914.
GA002 P804333 Anticline in shales and sandstones on river bank below Howden Dam. Derbyshire, July 31st 1914.
GA002 P804334 Anticline in shales and sandstones on river bank below Howden Dam. Derbyshire, July 31st 1914.
GA002 P804335 Darley Dale Quarry. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The Mountain Limestone forms in Derbyshire an inlier of an irregular shape stretching 20 miles from North to South and above 10 miles from East to West with a few little patches in other localities. Owing to earth movements this large inlier forms a pericline or dome, the beds dipping away from the middle of the dome in every direction.
GA002 P804336 Darley Dale Quarry. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The Mountain Limestone forms in Derbyshire an inlier of an irregular shape stretching 20 miles from North to South and above 10 miles from East to West with a few little patches in other localities. Owing to earth movements this large inlier forms a pericline or dome, the beds dipping away from the middle of the dome in every direction.
GA002 P804337 Darley Dale Quarry. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. On examination it appears that some of the layers had their origin from reef like accumulations very much like those in the Pacific coral islands and shell banks while others were more fragmental and made up of broken corals, crinoid stems and shells which the waves had spread over the sea bottom.
GA002 P804338 Darley Dale Quarry. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. On examination it appears that some of the layers had their origin from reef like accumulations very much like those in the Pacific coral islands and shell banks while others were more fragmental and made up of broken corals, crinoid stems and shells which the waves had spread over the sea bottom. Added note: Crinoidal limestone beds.
GA002 P804339 Dolomitized limestone or Dunstone showing the typical weathering into castellated masses at Wyn's Tor above Winster. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. [Group photo].
GA002 P804340 Dolomitized limestone or Dunstone showing the typical weathering into castellated masses at Wyn's Tor above Winster. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914.
GA002 P804341 Chert quarry, Winster. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. This chert is a silicious limestone which is sent to the Staffordshire potteries for making china and porcelain. Owing to its crystalline structure it differs from the nodules and layers of chert which are found in the upper beds of the Mountain limestone. [People].
GA002 P804342 Chert quarry, Winster. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. This chert is a silicious limestone which is sent to the Staffordshire potteries for making china and porcelain. Owing to its crystalline structure it differs from the nodules and layers of chert which are found in the upper beds of the Mountain limestone. [People].
GA002 P804343 Robin Hoods Stride or Mock Beggars Hall in the Fourth or Upper Kinder Scout Grit of the Millstone Grit. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The stride which Robin Hood must have taken to get the place named after him, that is, the distance from these two turrets is about 10 to 15 yards. [People].
GA002 P804344 Robin Hoods Stride or Mock Beggars Hall in the Fourth or Upper Kinder Scout Grit of the Millstone Grit. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The stride which Robin Hood must have taken to get the place named after him, that is, the distance from these two turrets is about 10 to 15 yards. [People].
GA002 P804345 Cone-In-Cone. Bullbridge Ambergate. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914.
GA002 P804346 The Dakin Valley, Alport, showing the thick horizontal beds of Carboniferous limestone. It is from these 'Scars' which are bare precipices or mural escarpments that Sedgwick named this the 'Scar limestone'. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. [People].
GA002 P804347 The Dakin Valley, Alport, showing the thick horizontal beds of Carboniferous limestone. It is from these 'Scars' which are bare precipices or mural escarpments that Sedgwick named this the 'Scar Limestone'. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914.
GA002 P804348 [Joints]. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. In these scars are frequently seen joints like the above which are formed by shrinkage and sometimes by disturbance. These cracks which are generally at right angles to the bedding are gradually enlanged by the action of water.
GA002 P804349 Tufa Quarry, Alport. This creamy white rock is formed by the deposition of lime from calcareous springs and is of variable texture, in places being hard and crystalline and in others soft, friable and cellular. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804350 Old Mill Quarry,Stanton Mill. The Black Shales of the Pendleside Series containing Posidoniella laevis are here seen to rest with unconformity on the limestones of the Lonsdalia subzone. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The shales which show no signs of disturbance rest evenly upon a surface formed by the truncated edges of the limestone beds. This shows the commencement of an anticlinal dome of limestone. If stripped of the shale above, the dome would have a knoll like aspect thus indicating contemporaneous elevation and erosion causing local unconformity. Added note: Grey limestones with strong chert, Carboniferous Limestone, Lonsdalia sub-zone. Black Shales, Pendleside Series.
GA002 P804351 Old Mill Quarry,Stanton Mill. The Black Shales of the Pendleside Series containing Posidoniella laevis are here seen to rest with unconformity on the Limestones of the Lonsdalia subzone. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The shales which show no signs of disturbance rest evenly upon a surface formed by the truncated edges of the limestone beds. This shows the commencement of an anticlinal dome of Limestone. If stripped of the shale above, the dome would have a knoll like aspect thus indicating contemporaneous elevation and erosion causing local unconformity. Added note: Limestone, Black Shales. [People].
GA002 P804352 Old Mill Quarry,Stanton Mill. The Black Shales of the Pendleside Series containing Posidoniella laevis are here seen to rest with unconformity on the Limestones of the Lonsdalia subzone. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914. The shales which show no signs of disturbance rest evenly upon a surface formed by the truncated edges of the limestone beds. This shows the commencement of an anticlinal dome of Limestone. If stripped of the shale above, the dome would have a knoll like aspect thus indicating contemporaneous elevation and erosion causing local unconformity.
GA002 P804353 River Dakin - Alport. This is an interesting case of a calcareous stream forming terraces of travertine or tufa. The calcium carbonate being thrown down in ridges or terraces by the escape of carbonic acid and evaporation. Derbyshire, August 1st 1914.
GA002 P804354 Harboro' [Harborough] pit, Brassington. Derbyshire, August 2nd 1914. These deposits of brightly coloured sands and clays in various shades of red and yellow with white are found in large irregular hollows in the Carboniferous Limestone occurring between Hartington and Brassington in a N.W. to S.E. direction. These hollows which are sometimes 100 yards across are thought to be swallow holes filled in with fine clay and clean sand with white and red quartzite pebbles. Their age is uncertain - they are evidently preglacial and some go so far as to consider them of Bunter age. The materials have the character of a broken up Kinder Scout Grit and the sands and pebbles agree with the Bunter Beds. The clay obtained here is used by the Derby Porcelain works. [Caption of two photos combined as form continuous text].
GA002 P804355 Harboro' [Harborough] pit, Brassington. Derbyshire, August 2nd 1914. These deposits of brightly coloured sands and clays in various shades of red and yellow with white are found in large irregular hollows in the Carboniferous Limestone occurring between Hartington and Brassington in a N.W. to S.E. direction. These hollows which are sometimes 100 yards across are thought to be swallow holes filled in with fine clay and clean sand with white and red quartzite pebbles. Their age is uncertain - they are evidently preglacial and some go so far as to consider them of Bunter age. The materials have the character of a broken up Kinder Scout Grit and the sands and pebbles agree with the Bunter Beds. The clay obtained here is used by the Derby Porcelain works. [Caption of two photos combined as form continuous text].
GA002 P804356 Carboniferous Limestone, Cromford. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804357 Cromford Quarry. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804358 Bonsall. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. [Group photo].
GA002 P804359 Quartzose Limestone, Bonsall. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804360 [Bonsall]. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. [Group photo - large version of previous].
GA002 P804361 Quarry in Spheroidal Dolerite - Pot Luck Farm (Drabble's Quarry), Bonsall. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. When the Carboniferous limestone had assumed its solid condition masses of molten matter were forced up from the interior of the Earth in some places crossing the beds and in others pushing between them now forming hard rock suitable for road metal. [People].
GA002 P804362 Quarry in spheroidal dolerite - Pot Luck Farm (Drabble's Quarry), Bonsall. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. When the Carboniferous limestone had assumed its solid condition masses of molten matter were forced up from the interior of the Earth in some places crossing the beds and in others pushing between them now forming hard rock suitable for road metal. [People].
GA002 P804363 ??????. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. In the process of cooling and contraction this rock frequently assumes a columnar structure and often divided by cross joints. In this case instead of being angular each segment owing to weathering takes a spheroidal form. It is stated that the cause of this is owing to the middle of each spheroid being a centre of crystallisation around which the different minerals of the rock arranged themselves.
GA002 P804364 ???????. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. In the process of cooling and contraction this rock frequently assumes a columnar structure and often divided by cross joints. In this case instead of being angular each segment owing to weathering takes a spheroidal form. It is stated that the cause of this is owing to the middle of each spheroid being a centre of crystallisation around which the different minerals of the rock arranged themselves.
GA002 P804365 The valley of the Derwent from near Masson Hill looking along Darley Dale. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804366 Limestone quarry, Matlock Bridge. This is in thinly bedded cherty limestones and contains fossils that show that it is of the subzone known as D3. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804367 The High Tor and Gorge of the Derwent through the Mountain Limestone which extends as far as Willersley when the river then winds through more open valleys to Derby and thence on to the Trent. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804368 Tufa Quarry, Matlock Bath. The circular holes were originally branches of trees coated by tufa. In course of time the wood decayed thus leaving spaces like pipes. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804369 The more solid pieces are used for building purposes, but the porous portions are only fit for rock gardens. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914.
GA002 P804370 Tufa. Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. A mass of twigs coated with tufa from the above quarry.
GA002 P804371 Tufa. Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. Tufa which also goes by the name of travertin [travertine] or calcareous sinter is a deposit of carbonate of lime thrown down by springs which flow through beds of limestone. In this case at Matlock these specimens are from lime obtained from the Carboniferous limestone. The rain in passing through the atmosphere takes up Carbonic acid and assisted by humic acid from the soil when it sinks into the limestone dissolves portions of it away. When it comes to the surface again in the form of springs it loses some of the carbonic acid and the lime is thrown down in the form of tufa and incrusting any object that happens to be present.
GA002 P804372 Tufa. Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. Tufa which also goes by the name of travertin [travertine] or calcareous sinter is a deposit of carbonate of lime thrown down by springs which flow through beds of limestone. In this case at Matlock these specimens are from lime obtained from the Carboniferous limestone. The rain in passing through the atmosphere takes up Carbonic acid and assisted by humic acid from the soil when it sinks into the limestone dissolves portions of it away. When it comes to the surface again in the form of springs it loses some of the carbonic acid and the lime is thrown down in the form of tufa and incrusting any object that happens to be present.
GA002 P804373 Tufa. Matlock Bath. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. Tufa which also goes by the name of Travertin [Travertine] or Calcareous Sinter is a deposit of Carbonate of Lime thrown down by springs which flow through beds of limestone. In this case at Matlock these specimens are from lime obtained from the Carboniferous limestone. The rain in passing through the atmosphere takes up Carbonic acid and assisted by humic acid from the soil when it sinks into the limestone dissolves portions of it away. When it comes to the surface again in the form of springs it loses some of the carbonic acid and the lime is thrown down in the form of tufa and incrusting any object that happens to be present.
GA002 P804374 Tufa which also goes by the name of travertin [travertine] or calcareous sinter is a deposit of carbonate of lime thrown down by springs which flow through beds of limestone. Derbyshire, August 3rd 1914. In this case at Matlock these specimens are from lime obtained from the Carboniferous limestone. The rain in passing through the atmosphere takes up Carbonic acid and assisted by humic acid from the soil when it sinks into the limestone dissolves portions of it away. When it comes to the surface again in the form of springs it loses some of the carbonic acid and the lime is thrown down in the form of tufa and incrusting any object that happens to be present.
GA002 P804375 Carlton Hill Vent. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914. The volcanoes from which the Derbyshire Toadstone was thrown out have long been buried under later deposits on the sea bottom but in places where these deposits have been cleared away were are able to see the necks or pipes through which the molten lava was forced up. Carlton Hill is one of these necks filled with Agglomerate and Basalt containing olivine nodules. [People].
GA002 P804376 Carlton Hill Vent. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914. The volcanoes from which the Derbyshire Toadstone was thrown out have long been buried under later deposits on the sea bottom but in places where these deposits have been cleared away were are able to see the necks or pipes through which the molten lava was forced up. Carlton Hill is one of these necks filled with Agglomerate and Basalt containing olivine nodules. [Person].
GA002 P804377 Owing to the combined result of crystallization and cooling causing contraction the Basalt weathers into a mass of rough spheroides. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914.
GA002 P804378 The Gorge of the River Wye through Carboniferous Limestone. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914.
GA002 P804379 Upper Lava resting on Carboniferous Limestone at Knott [Knot] Low, Millers Dale. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914. [People].
GA002 P804380 Upper Lava resting on Carboniferous Limestone at Knott [Knot] Low, Millers Dale. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914.
GA002 P804381 Ice-Scratched Boulder. Boulder Clay. Alport. Rowsley. Derbyshire, August 4th 1914.
GA002 P804382 Lyme Regis looking West. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. The town is built on the clayey portion of the Lias which is seen in the upper part of its cliffs. The limestones or Blue Lias are not seen in the town being bent downwards in the trough of a synclinal curve which bends the beds down to sea level.
GA002 P804383 Lyme Regis looking West. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. The town is built on the clayey portion of the Lias which is seen in the upper part of its cliffs. The limestones or Blue Lias are not seen in the town being bent downwards in the trough of a synclinal curve which bends the beds down to sea level.
GA002 P804384 Looking East from just west of the Cobb. The cliffs in the distance are , on the left Stonebarrow, the high one in the centre is Golden Cap with Thorncombe Beacon beyond. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804385 The Harbour of Lyme known as the Cobb. This is built of Cowstones within and faced with Portland Roach. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804386 Church Cliffs - Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Looking N.E. from point about 290 yards N.E. of Lyme Church. Added note: Table Ledge, Glass Bottle, Top Q. [Quick], Verity, Best, 2nd and Rattle, Mid Quick.
GA002 P804387 Church Cliffs - Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Looking N.W. from a point about 420 yards N.E. of Lyme Church. Added note: Grey, Glass Bottle, Top Quick, Verity, Best, Second, Rattle, Mid Quick, Gumption, 3rd Quick, Top Tape, 2nd Tape, Top Copper, Mongrel, 2nd Mongrel, Specketty.
GA002 P804388 Church Cliffs - Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Church Cliffs at about 360 yards N.E. of Lyme Church. Added note: Fish, Grey, Glass Bottle, Top Quick, Verity, Best, Second, Ratt [Rattle], M. Quick, Gumption, 3rd Quick, Top Tape, 2nd Tape, Top Copper, Mongrel.
GA002 P804389 Church Cliffs - Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Church Cliffs at about 220 yards N.E. of Lyme Church. Added note: Top Quick, Verity, Best, Second, Rattle, Mid Quick, Gumption.
GA002 P804390 Fault at Church Cliffs at about 260 yards N.E. of Lyme Church. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Added note: Grey Ledge, Glass Bottle, Top Quick, Verity, Best Bed, Second Bed, Rattle, Middle Quick, Gumption.
GA002 P804391 A view of Church Cliffs from very close to Lyme about 120 yards East of Lyme Church. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Added note: Grey Ledge, Glass Bottle, Top Quick, Verity, Best, 2nd Bed, Rattle.
GA002 P804392 Fault in centre of photograph. The downthrow is on the west or left hand side. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Added note: Glass Bottle, Top Quick, Verity, Best, 2nd, Rattle, Mid Quick, Gumption, Third Quick.
GA002 P804393 5/8 of a mile N.W. of Lyme Church. This is on the western limb of the Church Cliffs Anticline and represents a local disturbance with slight faulting of the bedding. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Added note: Glass Bottle, Best, 2nd, Rattle, Mid Quick, Gumption, Third Quick. [People].
GA002 P804394 The Burning Mound. This is composed of shales, iron pyrites and cement stones. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. This so called 'volcano' took fire in 1908. Rapid decomposition of the iron pyrites induced by a particularly wet season acting on clay with much inflammable (butuminous) matter in its composition is supposed to account for the phenomenon. Added note: About 1/2 mile N.E. of Lyme Church.
GA002 P804395 The Burning Mound. This is composed of Shales, iron pyrites and cement stones. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. This so called 'volcano' took fire in 1908. Rapid decomposition of the Iron Pyrites induced by a particularly wet season acting on clay with much inflammable (butuminous) matter in its composition is supposed to account for the phenomenon. Added note: About 1/2 mile N.E. of Lyme Church.
GA002 P804396 Pieces of baked shale showing discolouration in concentric rings according to different degrees of burning. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804397 Pieces of baked shale showing discolouration in concentric rings according to different degrees of burning. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804398 General view of the Cliffs and Coast looking East from about 3/4 mile N.E. of Lyme Church. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804399 General view of the cliffs and coast looking East from about 3/4 mile N.E. Of Lyme Church. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Added note: Bel. [Belemnite] Marls, Stellaris Beds.
GA002 P804400 The face of Black Ven at about 800 yards West of the end of Lower Sea Lane. Charmouth Beach and just east of Black Ven Rocks. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. Added note: Stellaris Beds, Birchi Bed.
GA002 P804401 The face of Black Ven at about 800 yards West of the end of Lower Sea Lane. Charmouth Beach and just east of Black Ven Rocks. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804402 Black Ven looking in a N.E. direction from between Canary Ledges and Cockpits about 5/8 of a mile west of Charmouth Beach. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804403 Black Ven looking in a N.E. direction from between Canary Ledges and Cockpits about 5/8 of a mile west of Charmouth Beach. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804404 Black Ven from the beach at Cockpits. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804405 Fault in the 'Shales-with-Beef' below the Birchi Bed. 'Beef' is a fibrous calcium carbonate. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804406 An undulation accompanying a fault in the Shales-with-Beef. The strings of Beef vary in thickness from a fraction of an inch up to 2 or 3 inches. Even when extremely thin they are nearly always double. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804407 Limestone nodule in Shales with Beef. These nodules often occur in connection with the Beef strings. When this occurs the two halves of the beef string diverge and the nodule lies between the enwrapping layers. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 30th 1914.
GA002 P804408 White Lias (Rhaetic beds) and Blue Lias Limestones and Shales at Pinhay Bay. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. The lower beds of the Rhaetic, the Black Avicular contorta shales can be seen at low tide on the foreshore but the Cotham Marble is not exposed owing no doubt to its coverings of beach shingle and boulders. It has however been observed at Charton Bay.
GA002 P804409 White Lias (Rhaetic beds) and Blue Lias Limestones and Shales at Pinhay Bay. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. The lower beds of the Rhaetic, the Black Avicular contorta shales can be seen at low tide on the foreshore but the Cotham Marble is not exposed owing no doubt to its coverings of beach shingle and boulders. It has however been observed at Charton Bay.
GA002 P804410 The Rhaetic Beds . Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. The Rhaetic Beds mark the commencement of the physical changes which terminated the continental conditions of the Trias and ushered in the marine conditions of the Jurassic, changes that evidently were not brought about uniformly over the British area. Added note: White Lias.
GA002 P804411 The Rhaetic Beds . Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. The Rhaetic Beds mark the commencement of the physical changes which terminated the continental conditions of the Trias and ushered in the marine conditions of the Jurassic, changes that evidently were not brought about uniformly over the British area. Added note: Lias, White Lias or Rhaetic, Black shales.
GA002 P804412 The White Lias is a white or cream coloured limestone hard and smooth grained in the lowest beds. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Some of the more marly beds contain pebble like concretions composed of limestone similar to the white limestone. These stand out on the weathered surface of the rock in small lumps and impart to it a comglomerate appearance.
GA002 P804413 The White Lias is a white or cream coloured limestone hard and smooth grained in the lowest beds. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Some of the more marly beds contain pebble like concretions composed of limestone similar to the white limestone. These stand out on the weathered surface of the rock in small lumps and impart to it a comglomerate appearance. Added note: White Lias. [Person].
GA002 P804414 The White Lias is a white or cream coloured limestone hard and smooth grained in the lowest beds. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Some of the more marly beds contain pebble like concretions composed of limestone similar to the white limestone. These stand out on the weathered surface of the rock in small lumps and impart to it a comglomerate appearance. [Caption used as for above].
GA002 P804415 The White Lias is a white or cream coloured limestone hard and smooth grained in the lowest beds. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Some of the more marly beds contain pebble like concretions composed of limestone similar to the white limestone. These stand out on the weathered surface of the rock in small lumps and impart to it a comglomerate appearance. [Caption used as for above].
GA002 P804416 Fault in White Lias, Pinhay Bay. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914.
GA002 P804417 Sea cave worn out by the sea in a disturbed portion of the White Lias. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914.
GA002 P804418 [Coastal erosion]. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Owing to the combined action of frost and springs on the one hand and the waves on the other a great amount of waste is going on on this coast the sea lifting blocks out along planes of jointing when the waves dash them about and grind them up.
GA002 P804419 [Coastal erosion]. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Owing to the combined action of frost and springs on the one hand and the waves on the other a great amount of waste is going on on this coast the sea lifting blocks out along planes of jointing when the waves dash them about and grind them up.
GA002 P804420 Pinhay Bay. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. Owing to the Easterly dip of the Lias beds it is quite easy to trace the upwards succession of these beds. At Pinhay Bay we start eastward along the shore when we see higher and higher beds of the Blue Lias series as we pass over them in succession. [photo is likely missing on this page].
GA002 P804421 [Limestone ledges]. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. The beds of limestone or ledges cropping out on the sea shore. These form natural breakwaters but unfortunately the Lyme people allow a cement company to break them up and use them for export thus endangering the cliffs that protect the town.
GA002 P804422 [Limestone ledges]. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914. The beds of limestone or ledges cropping out on the sea shore. These form natural breakwaters but unfortunately the Lyme people allow a cement company to break them up and use them for export thus endangering the cliffs that protect the town.
GA002 P804423 Amaltheus Margaritatus. Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914.
GA002 P804424 Asteroceras Brookei. Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914.
GA002 P804425 Large ammonites on surface of ledge near Seven Rock Point. This ammonite cemetery contains specimens from 12 to 18 inches in diameter. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914.
GA002 P804426 Large ammonites on surface of ledge near Seven Rock Point. This Ammonite Cemetery contains specimens from 12 to 18 inches in diameter. Excursion to Lyme Regis, May 31st 1914.
GA002 P804427 Looking West over Charmouth from a field near the top of Stonebarrow Lane E. of Charmouth. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804428 Looking E.N.E. from near the Lyme Road just East of the Bellows over Charmouth Village. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804429 View of Charmouth Beach from Cockpits. The rocks in the foreground are the Canary Ledges, the first stages in a recent plane of marine denudation. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804430 Undulating strata at about the level of the Lower and Upper Cement Beds capped with much drift and Hill creep. Mouth of the River Char. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804431 The large amphitheatre shaped hollow in Stonebarrow Cliff immediately west of Fairy Dell. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. Between June 1908 and 1909 a large fall occurred here exposing a fine section of the fault on the right or eastern side of the hollow. Added note: Drift, Foxmould, Sand of the Cowstone horizon, Gault.
GA002 P804432 The large amphitheatre shaped hollow in Stonebarrow Cliff immediately west of Fairy Dell. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. Between June 1908 and 1909 a large fall occurred here exposing a fine section of the fault on the right or eastern side of the hollow.
GA002 P804433 The Western bank of the amphitheatre shaped hollow. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804434 The Seaward Cliff below Fairy Dell in Belemnite Marls. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. Added note: Belemnite Marls.
GA002 P804435 Black Ven looking East from the Western end about 3/4 mile from both Charmouth and Lyme. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804436 Black Ven looking East from the Western end about 3/4 mile from both Charmouth and Lyme. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804437 Fairy Dell looking East from its extreme western end. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804438 Fairy Dell looking East from its extreme western end. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914.
GA002 P804439 Ground Plan and Sections of the Great Landslip at Great and Little Bindon and Dowlands in the Parish of Axmouth on the East Coast of Devon, which took place on the 25th December 1839. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Numbering on photos ignored]. [Many annotations on section not transcribed].
GA002 P804440 Geological Section of the Chasm, Undercliff and New Raised Beach. From the Eastern Boundary of Great Bindon to the Sea. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Numbering on photos ignored]. [Many annotations on section not transcribed].
GA002 P804441 Geological View of the Coast from Lyme Regis in the County of Devon to Axmouth Harbour on the East Coast of Devon. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Left hand end of 4] [Numbering on photos ignored]. [Many annotations on section not transcribed].
GA002 P804442 Geological View of the Coast from Lyme Regis in the County of Devon to Axmouth Harbour on the East Coast of Devon. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Right hand end of 3] [Numbering on photos ignored]. [Many annotations on section not transcribed].
GA002 P804443 A view of the Landslip from Great Bindon. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Right hand end of 3] [Numbering on photos ignored].
GA002 P804444 View of the Great Chasm from its Western end at Bindon. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Right hand end of 3] [Numbering on photos ignored].
GA002 P804445 View of the Landslip at Whitlands, about one mile to the Eastward of the great Chasm at Dowlands which took place on the 3rd of February 1840. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. Pentire Haven - Contorted Frasnian beds [incorrect title]. [Artist's impression].
GA002 P804446 Landslip under Southdown between Beer Head and Branscombe, which took place in 1789-90 looking Westward to Sidmouth Torbay and the Start Point. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. Pentire Haven - Sill in Frasnian beds [incorrect title]. [Artist's impression].
GA002 P804447 View from the New Beach, looking Westward to Beer Head. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Artist's impression].
GA002 P804448 View from the Western end of the beach near Culverhole Point, looking Eastward. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 1st 1914. [Artist's impression].
GA002 P804449 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804450 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804451 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804452 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804453 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804454 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804455 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804456 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804457 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804458 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804459 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804460 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804461 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804462 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804463 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804464 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804465 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804466 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804467 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804468 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804469 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804470 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804471 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804472 The Landslip. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804473 The Great Cleft is a fissure running parallel to the face of the cliff thus cutting off a thick slide of rock. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The crack first started in 1886 and had gradually widened year by year but rather more rapidly of late than at first. The base is cut in Upper Greensand the cherty nature of which is is [sic] well seen. Next comes the Lower Chalk about 3ft thick and then White Chalk of the zone of Rhynchonella cuvieri 60 feet thick followed by 71 feet of Terebratulina gracilis zone.
GA002 P804474 The Great Cleft is a fissure running parallel to the face of the cliff thus cutting off a thick slide of rock. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The crack first started in 1886 and had gradually widened year by year but rather more rapidly of late than at first. The base is cut in Upper Greensand the cherty nature of which is is [sic] well seen. Next comes the Lower Chalk about 3ft thick and then White Chalk of the zone of Rhynchonella cuvieri 60 feet thick followed by 71 feet of Terebratulina gracilis zone.
GA002 P804475 The Great Cleft is a fissure running parallel to the face of the cliff thus cutting off a thick slide of rock. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The crack first started in 1886 and had gradually widened year by year but rather more rapidly of late than at first. The base is cut in Upper Greensand the cherty nature of which is is [sic] well seen. Next comes the Lower Chalk about 3ft thick and then White Chalk of the zone of Rhynchonella cuvieri 60 feet thick followed by 71 feet of Terebratulina gracilis zone.
GA002 P804476 The Great Cleft is a fissure running parallel to the face of the cliff thus cutting off a thick slide of rock. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The crack first started in 1886 and had gradually widened year by year but rather more rapidly of late than at first. The base is cut in Upper Greensand the cherty nature of which is is [sic] well seen. Next comes the Lower Chalk about 3ft thick and then White Chalk of the zone of Rhynchonella cuvieri 60 feet thick followed by 71 feet of Terebratulina gracilis zone.
GA002 P804477 The Chapel Rock. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The Chapel Rock is a lofty detached mass of Chalk of the zones of Terebratulina gracilis, Holaster planus, and Micraster cor-testudinarium which has slipped from the main face of Pinhay Cliffs. It is between 120 and 130 ft high.
GA002 P804478 The Chapel Rock. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The Chapel Rock is a lofty detached mass of Chalk of the zones of Terebratulina gracilis, Holaster planus, and Micraster cor-testudinarium which has slipped from the main face of Pinhay Cliffs. It is between 120 and 130 ft high.
GA002 P804479 Rhacoceras Loscombei. Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804480 Rhacoceras Loscombei. Lyme Regis. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804481 Charton Bay. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The higher portions are seen to include the Black Shales and White Lias estimated to be 25 feet thick while the lower portions consist of alternations of hard and soft marls passing gradually into the red and green marls of the Keuper.
GA002 P804482 Charton Bay. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The higher portions are seen to include the Black Shales and White Lias estimated to be 25 feet thick while the lower portions consist of alternations of hard and soft marls passing gradually into the red and green marls of the Keuper.
GA002 P804483 Pinhay Bay. This ravine and watercourse coincides with a fault that throws down the Blue Lias limestones some 40 feet on the west. On the east the lowest beds of the Lias are seen resting on the White Lias. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804484 Humble Point. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914.
GA002 P804485 Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. [Person].
GA002 P804486 Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. [People].
GA002 P804487 At Charton Bay the entire sequence of the Rhaetic Beds can be seen. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The beds are bent into a gentle anticline at the base of which traces of grey marls with reddish tinges may be detected. Above come the grey marls with shale beds, greenish marls and laminated mudstones. Then the Black Shales followed by mammillated Landscape stone and capped by White Lias. [People].
GA002 P804488 At Charton Bay the entire sequence of the Rhaetic Beds can be seen. Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914. The beds are bent into a gentle anticline at the base of which traces of grey marls with reddish tinges may be detected. Above come the grey marls with shale beds, greenish marls and laminated mudstones. Then the Black Shales followed by mammillated Landscape stone and capped by White Lias. [People].
GA002 P804489 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. On the West side of the Valley of the Axe at South Down between Beer and Branscombe a very considerable landslip occurred in March 1790 which for importance and picturesque effect was unrivalled until the later convulsion at Bindon.
GA002 P804490 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. Here in the middle of the night a tract of from seven to ten acres ranging along the brow of a steep cliff immediately overhanging the sea suddenly sank down from 200 to 260 feet presenting a striking group of shattered pinnacles and columns of chalk intermingled with the sunken fragments of the fields thus torn awar from their native site.
GA002 P804491 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The remains of hedges still traversed these fragments and a stile was seen undisturbed on the summit of one of the subsided columnar masses. The eye looking from above on this wild scene of ruin saw it finely backed by the deep blue of the channel beneath for in this case the landslip in question formed the first term in the commencement of a new and incipient undercliff which fresh falls and the lapse of centuries will be required to bring into the state of that between Lyme and Seaton.
GA002 P804492 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The remains of hedges still traversed these fragments and a stile was seen undisturbed on the summit of one of the subsided columnar masses. The eye looking from above on this wild scene of ruin saw it finely backed by the deep blue of the channel beneath for in this case the landslip in question formed the first term in the commencement of a new and incipient undercliff which fresh falls and the lapse of centuries will be required to bring into the state of that between Lyme and Seaton.
GA002 P804493 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. It is stated that many previous symptoms had foreshown this catastrophe. A fissure had opened along the line where the disruption afterwards occurred, for months before the subsidence ensued. Another previous sign was given by the stoppage about two years before of a copious stream of very fine water which used to flow out and just below the freestone quarry opened then as now about the middle of the cliff.
GA002 P804494 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. It is stated that many previous symptoms had foreshown this catastrophe. A fissure had opened along the line where the disruption afterwards occurred, for months before the subsidence ensued. Another previous sign was given by the stoppage about two years before of a copious stream of very fine water which used to flow out and just below the freestone quarry opened then as now about the middle of the cliff.
GA002 P804495 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The strong persuasion of the neighbours connects this with the cause of the subsequent convulsion and the probable opinion is that it had forced a new channel through some of the fissures which were then opening. A fresh stream broke out after the landslip nearer the beach.
GA002 P804496 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The strong persuasion of the neighbours connects this with the cause of the subsequent convulsion and the probable opinion is that it had forced a new channel through some of the fissures which were then opening. A fresh stream broke out after the landslip nearer the beach.
GA002 P804497 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The subsided mass pressed forward into the sea so as to approach within 100 yards of a submarine crag called the Sherborne Rock which before then was about 400 yards from the coast line. This subsidence was attended by the same phenomenon as at Culverhole and Whitelands namely the elevation of the adjacent submarine rocks for the fishermen related that joints in which they had laid their crab pots beneath the water and over which they had sailed the night before with a depth of 8 or 10 feet they found to their astonishment raised far above the sea level on the next morning with their pots stranded on a reef at a height of 15 ft in the air. As the catastrophe occurred during the night no eye witnessed it but the fishermen who were out (the night being fine) were alarmed by the continual cracking of the cliff.
GA002 P804498 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The subsided mass pressed forward into the sea so as to approach within 100 yards of a submarine crag called the Sherborne Rock which before then was about 400 yards from the coast line. This subsidence was attended by the same phenomenon as at Culverhole and Whitelands namely the elevation of the adjacent submarine rocks for the fishermen related that joints in which they had laid their crab pots beneath the water and over which they had sailed the night before with a depth of 8 or 10 feet they found to their astonishment raised far above the sea level on the next morning with their pots stranded on a reef at a height of 15 ft in the air. As the catastrophe occurred during the night no eye witnessed it but the fishermen who were out (the night being fine) were alarmed by the continual cracking of the cliff.
GA002 P804499 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The subsided mass pressed forward into the sea so as to approach within 100 yards of a submarine crag called the Sherborne Rock which before then was about 400 yards from the coast line. This subsidence was attended by the same phenomenon as at Culverhole and Whitelands namely the elevation of the adjacent submarine rocks for the fishermen related that joints in which they had laid their crab pots beneath the water and over which they had sailed the night before with a depth of 8 or 10 feet they found to their astonishment raised far above the sea level on the next morning with their pots stranded on a reef at a height of 15 ft in the air. As the catastrophe occurred during the night no eye witnessed it but the fishermen who were out (the night being fine) were alarmed by the continual cracking of the cliff.
GA002 P804500 The Hooken Cliffs. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. The subsided mass pressed forward into the sea so as to approach within 100 yards of a submarine crag called the Sherborne Rock which before then was about 400 yards from the coast line. This subsidence was attended by the same phenomenon as at Culverhole and Whitelands namely the elevation of the adjacent submarine rocks for the fishermen related that joints in which they had laid their crab pots beneath the water and over which they had sailed the night before with a depth of 8 or 10 feet they found to their astonishment raised far above the sea level on the next morning with their pots stranded on a reef at a height of 15 ft in the air. As the catastrophe occurred during the night no eye witnessed it but the fishermen who were out (the night being fine) were alarmed by the continual cracking of the cliff.
GA002 P804501 Microceroceras Birchii. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804502 Androgynoceras Lataecosta. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804503 Echioceras Raricostatum. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804504 Deroceras Armatum. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804505 Amblycoceras Planicosta. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804506 Amblycoceras Planicosta. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804507 Asteroceras Obtusum Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804508 [Slab of ammonites]. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914]. [No caption].
GA002 P804509 Oxynoticeras Lymensis. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].
GA002 P804510 Oxynoticeras Victoris. Lyme Regis. [Excursion to Lyme Regis, June 2nd 1914].