Editing Yorkshire rocks and landscape: a field guide

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An introductory chapter outlines the geological history of the Yorkshire area, providing a framework for the details of the local geology. Each excursion begins with general information on the geology and/or geomorphology covered in the itinerary. Brief notes cover access, parking and walking distances, together with lists of useful Ordnance Survey (O.S.) and British Geological Survey (B.G.S.) maps. In many excursions the background information or itinerary includes notes on the historical exploitation of geological resources, and on other related matters. A section towards the end of the book lists museums in Yorkshire that have geological displays or collections.
 
An introductory chapter outlines the geological history of the Yorkshire area, providing a framework for the details of the local geology. Each excursion begins with general information on the geology and/or geomorphology covered in the itinerary. Brief notes cover access, parking and walking distances, together with lists of useful Ordnance Survey (O.S.) and British Geological Survey (B.G.S.) maps. In many excursions the background information or itinerary includes notes on the historical exploitation of geological resources, and on other related matters. A section towards the end of the book lists museums in Yorkshire that have geological displays or collections.
  
''All excursions have certain basic requirements for both safety and enjoyment.'' These include stout shoes or walking boots, sensible clothes and appropriate maps. On higher ground, it may be much colder and more windy than in the valleys, and low cloud may not just spoil appreciation of geological and geomorphological views of the landscape, but may present a danger if you become lost. On foreshores, wellington boots may be a suitable alternative but, whatever your footwear, wet rocks can be very slippery.
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All excursions have certain basic requirements for both safety and enjoyment. These include stout shoes or walking boots, sensible clothes and appropriate maps. On higher ground, it may be much colder and more windy than in the valleys, and low cloud may not just spoil appreciation of geological and geomorphological views of the landscape, but may present a danger if you become lost. On foreshores, wellington boots may be a suitable alternative but, whatever your footwear, wet rocks can be very slippery.
  
 
For more specific dangers, notes are given in the introductions to the relevant excursions. However, it is worth repeating some general points. In locations near quarry or cliff faces, a safety helmet should be worn. Always look at the state of steep faces and, if in doubt about their safety, do not approach them. When using a hammer, it is advisable to wear safety goggles and to make sure that fragments you chip off do not hit other people. In any coastal situation, the state of the tide may be crucial, not only to your view of the geology but to your safety. Always check on the time of low tide and do not start an excursion on a rising tide where access to and from the foreshore is limited.
 
For more specific dangers, notes are given in the introductions to the relevant excursions. However, it is worth repeating some general points. In locations near quarry or cliff faces, a safety helmet should be worn. Always look at the state of steep faces and, if in doubt about their safety, do not approach them. When using a hammer, it is advisable to wear safety goggles and to make sure that fragments you chip off do not hit other people. In any coastal situation, the state of the tide may be crucial, not only to your view of the geology but to your safety. Always check on the time of low tide and do not start an excursion on a rising tide where access to and from the foreshore is limited.

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