OR/14/029 Introduction: Difference between revisions

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The London Basin 1:50 000 resolution geological model covers a total area of 4 800 km<sup>2</sup> in southeast England (Figure 1), stretching from easting 450 000 to 570 000 and from northing 160 000 to 200 000. Because of the large size of the modelled area, the initial construction was divided into twelve 20 x 20 km tiles (Figure 1). A separate 3D geological model was constructed for each tile using the GSI3D software and methodology (Kessler & Mathers 2004, Kessler et al. 2009). The twelve model tiles were later merged into a unified model and subsequent modelling and calculation of the bedrock units was completed in GOCAD®. This report summarises the metadata compiled during the construction of the individual tiles and the development of the combined model.
The London Basin 1:50 000 resolution geological model covers a total area of 4 800 km<sup>2</sup> in southeast England (Figure 1), stretching from easting 450 000 to 570 000 and from northing 160 000 to 200 000. Because of the large size of the modelled area, the initial construction was divided into twelve 20 x 20 km tiles (Figure 1). A separate 3D geological model was constructed for each tile using the GSI3D software and methodology (Kessler & Mathers 2004<ref name="Kessler 2004">KESSLER, H and MATHERS, S J. 2004. From geological maps to models — finally capturing the geologists’ vision. ''Geoscientist'', 14/10, pp. 4–6. </ref>, Kessler et al. 2009<ref name="Kessler 2009">KESSLER, H, MATHERS, S J and SOBISCH, H-G., 2009. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology. ''Computers and Geosciences'', vol 35, pp 1311–1321. </ref>). The twelve model tiles were later merged into a unified model and subsequent modelling and calculation of the bedrock units was completed in GOCAD®. This report summarises the metadata compiled during the construction of the individual tiles and the development of the combined model.
 
[[Image:OR14029_figure1.jpg|thumb|600px|center|'''Figure 1''' Location of the London model and component tiles.]]
[[Image:OR14029_figure1.jpg|thumb|600px|center|'''Figure 1''' Location of the London model and component tiles.]]
==References==






[[Category:OR/14/029 The London Basin superficial and bedrock LithoFrame 50 model| 01]]
[[Category:OR/14/029 The London Basin superficial and bedrock LithoFrame 50 model| 01]]

Revision as of 09:57, 10 August 2015

H Burke, S J Mathers, J P Williamson, S Thorpe, J Ford and R L Terrington. 2014. The London Basin superficial and bedrock LithoFrame 50 Model. Nottingham, UK, British geological Survey.

The London Basin 1:50 000 resolution geological model covers a total area of 4 800 km2 in southeast England (Figure 1), stretching from easting 450 000 to 570 000 and from northing 160 000 to 200 000. Because of the large size of the modelled area, the initial construction was divided into twelve 20 x 20 km tiles (Figure 1). A separate 3D geological model was constructed for each tile using the GSI3D software and methodology (Kessler & Mathers 2004[1], Kessler et al. 2009[2]). The twelve model tiles were later merged into a unified model and subsequent modelling and calculation of the bedrock units was completed in GOCAD®. This report summarises the metadata compiled during the construction of the individual tiles and the development of the combined model.

Figure 1 Location of the London model and component tiles.

References

  1. KESSLER, H and MATHERS, S J. 2004. From geological maps to models — finally capturing the geologists’ vision. Geoscientist, 14/10, pp. 4–6.
  2. KESSLER, H, MATHERS, S J and SOBISCH, H-G., 2009. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology. Computers and Geosciences, vol 35, pp 1311–1321.