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'''Hydrogeology of Wales'''<br>
'''Hydrogeology of Wales'''<br>


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Wales receives wet westerly winds and is consequently well-endowed with water resources. In addition to its surface waters, Wales also has a wide range of aquifers that reflect its diverse geology, and although groundwater cannot compete with the surface water resources in terms of volume, it does offer a valuable alternative or supplementary source, particularly in rural areas. Groundwater has stable physical and chemical properties, which are beneficial to a number of industries including brewing, distilling, fish farming and dairy processing and it provides a source of alkalinity when blended with the often-acidic surface waters derived from upland gathering grounds. Groundwater is not only an important resource but it also maintains low river flows during drier periods with continued discharge of groundwater base flow into surface waters. Groundwater is also a potential hazard — mine dewatering has taxed Welsh mining engineers ever since the Industrial Revolution.  [[Hydrogeology of Wales: Introduction | '''(Read the full article...)''']]
Almost all groundwater starts life as rainfall. Some rain is taken up by plants, some runs over the land surface or through soils to rivers, and some soaks down through the soil into aquifers. Below the water table, all the spaces in the soil or rock are completely filled with water — groundwater (Figure 1). In Scotland, groundwater occurs almost everywhere beneath our feet, and the water table is usually within 10 m of the ground surface. As a store of water that can provide a reliable source of water for drinking and other purposes, groundwater is often accessible close to where it is required, and is cheaper to treat than surface water in lochs and/or reservoirs. In rural areas in particular, groundwater is a vital water source, and it plays an important role in Scotland’s economy.  [[OR/15/028 Introduction | '''(Read the full article...)''']]

Revision as of 08:03, 5 April 2016

Hydrogeology of Wales

15028 fig1.jpg

Almost all groundwater starts life as rainfall. Some rain is taken up by plants, some runs over the land surface or through soils to rivers, and some soaks down through the soil into aquifers. Below the water table, all the spaces in the soil or rock are completely filled with water — groundwater (Figure 1). In Scotland, groundwater occurs almost everywhere beneath our feet, and the water table is usually within 10 m of the ground surface. As a store of water that can provide a reliable source of water for drinking and other purposes, groundwater is often accessible close to where it is required, and is cheaper to treat than surface water in lochs and/or reservoirs. In rural areas in particular, groundwater is a vital water source, and it plays an important role in Scotland’s economy. (Read the full article...)