Template:Featured article1: Difference between revisions

From MediaWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
[checked revision][checked revision]
No edit summary
No edit summary
Line 1: Line 1:
[[Image:P929859.jpg|frameless| right|300px| ]]
[[Image:P929859.jpg|frameless| right|300px| ]]
'''London Region Atlas of Topsoil Geochemistry'''<br>
'''The geology of Northern Ireland'''<br>


The simplified geological map used in this atlas, and in particular for creating the soil parent material (PM) classes, is based on the classification used for radon mapping in England and Wales (Miles and Appleton, 2005). The area is underlain by Cretaceous and Palaeogene bedrock, which is covered in some areas by Quaternary superficial deposits. Artificial ground is not used as a soil PM class, because spatial information on the distribution of artificial ground in urban areas in the UK is incomplete. Parent material classes are summarised in Table 2 with an indication of the number of topsoil results associated with each class. . [[London Atlas: Geology | '''(Read the full article...)''']]
On a global scale Northern Ireland, despite being a mere 0.00001% of the land area of planet Earth, presents an opportunity to study an almost unparalleled variety of geology in such a small area. The diverse ages of the rocks present in Northern Ireland is illustrated in these articles by the [[Geology_of_Northern_Ireland:_our_natural_foundation|contents menu]]. Their stratigraphical record commences in the Mesoproterozoic and includes representatives in all of the systems up to and including the Palaeogene. If the Cambrian age attributed to upper parts of the Dalradian Supergroup in Scotland is substantiated then it is likely that their correlatives in Northern Ireland will fall within that system . . . [[Introduction_to_the_geology_of_Northern_Ireland | '''(Read the full article...)''']]

Revision as of 15:00, 26 September 2017

P929859.jpg

The geology of Northern Ireland

On a global scale Northern Ireland, despite being a mere 0.00001% of the land area of planet Earth, presents an opportunity to study an almost unparalleled variety of geology in such a small area. The diverse ages of the rocks present in Northern Ireland is illustrated in these articles by the contents menu. Their stratigraphical record commences in the Mesoproterozoic and includes representatives in all of the systems up to and including the Palaeogene. If the Cambrian age attributed to upper parts of the Dalradian Supergroup in Scotland is substantiated then it is likely that their correlatives in Northern Ireland will fall within that system . . . (Read the full article...)