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'''The geology of Northern Ireland'''<br>
'''Bristol and Gloucester regioal guide - '''<br>


On a global scale Northern Ireland, despite being a mere 0.00001% of the land area of planet Earth, presents an opportunity to study an almost unparalleled variety of geology in such a small area. The diverse ages of the rocks present in Northern Ireland is illustrated in these articles by the [[Geology_of_Northern_Ireland:_our_natural_foundation|contents menu]]. Their stratigraphical record commences in the Mesoproterozoic and includes representatives in all of the systems up to and including the Palaeogene. If the Cambrian age attributed to upper parts of the Dalradian Supergroup in Scotland is substantiated then it is likely that their correlatives in Northern Ireland will fall within that system . . . [[Introduction_to_the_geology_of_Northern_Ireland | '''(Read the full article...)''']]
The area dealt with comprises the Cotswolds and the Severn Estuary region, and includes the greater part of the counties of Avon, Gloucestershire and Somerset (excluding west Somerset); also, for geological continuity, small parts of the counties of Gwent, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Wiltshire and Dorset. Geologically speaking, it is one of the most varied districts of Britain, for, with the exception of the Ordovician and possibly the Permian, there is exposed at the surface every geological system from the Cambrian to the Cretaceous . . . [[Bristol and Gloucester region - an introduction | '''(Read the full article...)''']]

Revision as of 08:41, 11 December 2019

P894510.jpg

Bristol and Gloucester regioal guide -

The area dealt with comprises the Cotswolds and the Severn Estuary region, and includes the greater part of the counties of Avon, Gloucestershire and Somerset (excluding west Somerset); also, for geological continuity, small parts of the counties of Gwent, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Wiltshire and Dorset. Geologically speaking, it is one of the most varied districts of Britain, for, with the exception of the Ordovician and possibly the Permian, there is exposed at the surface every geological system from the Cambrian to the Cretaceous . . . (Read the full article...)