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[[Image:File:Africa Hgcl Envs.png|frameless| right|300px| ]]
[[Image:P894510.jpg|frameless| right|200px| ]]
'''Hydrogeological environments in Africa'''<br>
'''Bristol and Gloucester regional guide'''<br>


How and where groundwater occurs depends primarily on geology; geomorphology/weathering; and rainfall (both current and historic). The interaction between these three factors gives rise to complex hydrogeological environments with countless variations in the quantity, quality, ease of access to and renewability of groundwater resources. Developing groundwater resources therefore depends on a good understanding of hydrogeology. Africa has huge diversity in geology, climate and hydrology, and as a result, the hydrogeology of Africa is hugely variable. [[Overview_of_Groundwater_in_Africa | '''(Read the full article...)''']]
The area dealt with comprises the Cotswolds and the Severn Estuary region, and includes the greater part of the counties of Avon, Gloucestershire and Somerset (excluding west Somerset); also, for geological continuity, small parts of the counties of Gwent, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Wiltshire and Dorset. Geologically speaking, it is one of the most varied districts of Britain, for, with the exception of the Ordovician and possibly the Permian, there is exposed at the surface every geological system from the Cambrian to the Cretaceous . . . [[Bristol and Gloucester region - an introduction | '''(Read the full article...)''']]

Latest revision as of 08:54, 6 January 2020

P894510.jpg

Bristol and Gloucester regional guide

The area dealt with comprises the Cotswolds and the Severn Estuary region, and includes the greater part of the counties of Avon, Gloucestershire and Somerset (excluding west Somerset); also, for geological continuity, small parts of the counties of Gwent, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Wiltshire and Dorset. Geologically speaking, it is one of the most varied districts of Britain, for, with the exception of the Ordovician and possibly the Permian, there is exposed at the surface every geological system from the Cambrian to the Cretaceous . . . (Read the full article...)